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SCP302: Physics App (2011-2012)

CURRICULUM PROGRAM: Science
COURSE TITLE: Physics Applications
CALENDAR YEAR: 2011-2012
GRADE LEVEL: 9-12
CODE: SCP302
TYPE: GS
CREDITS:
COURSE LENGTH: 36 weeks

Laboratory Requirement: Students who take this course spend a minimum of 30% of their time engaged in hands-on laboratory exercises. All DoDEA Science courses have a minimum 30% dedicated time period for laboratory exercises. This translates to approximately 54 instructional days or 16 to 27 multi-day laboratories dedicated to student hands on laboratory time. Demonstrations and virtual laboratories, while useful in the classroom, do not count toward the 30% laboratory requirement.

Major Concepts/Content: This course is designed to present concepts of physics in relation to real- world experiences. Information is presented in an integrated approach, linking physics with technology, social perspectives, and the history and nature of science.

The course presents a thematic approach to physics using explorations of topics. Kinematics and dynamics are introduced by studying the physics of sports and transportation systems. Communication and information technologies are used to examine wave theory, light, and sound. Electrical and thermal energy topics are studied within the context of the home, as well as on a global scale. Applications of physics to health and medicine provide opportunities to study x-rays, CT scans, and ultrasound. Scientific predictions, such as those associated with radioactive decay, Newton’s first two laws, the Law of Universal Gravitation, and special relativity, are contrasted with non-scientific views in order to highlight the characteristics of good science.


Major Instructional Activities: Scientific inquiry is defined as the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on the evidence derived from their work. Scientific inquiry also refers to the activities through which students develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, as well as an understanding of how scientists study the natural world (NSTA, 2004). Based on the philosophy that scientific knowledge is best acquired through inquiry, the course uses a variety of techniques to promote and inquiry in the classroom (ex. multiple revisions, high quality questioning, synthesis, making conclusions based on evidence, etc).

Instructional activities are staged in appropriate settings. They include laboratories, classrooms, forms of technology, and field studies. Teaching strategies include in depth laboratory investigations, demonstrations, collaborative peer-to-peer discussions, and student hands-on experiences.


Major Evaluative Techniques: All aspects of progress in science are measured using multiple methods such as authentic assessments, performance assessments, formative assessments, observational assessments, projects, research activities, reports, group and individual student work and conventional summative assessments.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of Physics Applications, students should be able to:

  • Engage in full and partial scientific inquiries to design, conduct, and communicate scientific investigations to explore ideas about the natural world.
  • Use scientific inquiry to design and conduct scientific investigations to meet a human need, make a decision, solve a human problem, or develop a product.
  • Recognize and describe the interrelationship between science and technology.
  • Apply the tools of technology (e.g., computers) in scientific endeavors.
  • Identify qualities inherent in scientific behavior (e.g., reasoning, insight, energy, skill, and creativity).
  • Discuss contributions of men and women of various social and ethnic backgrounds to science and technology.
  • Apply science concepts to make decisions (weighing risks and benefits) about students' personal health and well-being.
  • Assess energy transfer in the earth system and explain dynamic processes that determine global climate.
  • Understand the principles of motion and forces.
  • Apply principles of conservation of energy and describe the associated increase in disorder.
  • Relate the interactions between matter and energy.