Code Type:

  • NC = No Credit
  • EL = Elective
  • G = Grad. Requirement
  • GC = Computer
  • GD = Second Language
  • GE = Social Studies
  • GF = Fine Arts
  • GG = US Government
  • GH = Health
  • GL = Language Arts
  • GM = Mathematics
  • GP = Physical Education
  • GS = Science
  • GU = US History
  • GV = Careers
  • MS = Middle School
  • SE = Special Education
  • AP = Advanced Placement
  • G-CTE = Career
  • G-CTE/c = Career (c)
  • NC = No Credit
  • RP = Repeat COurse
  • REG = Regular Course/Credit
  • W = Weighted
  • MC2 = Multiple Credit 2
  • MC3 = Multiple Credit 3
  • MS = Middle School
  • ES = Elementary School

Back to Previous Page  | Curriculum Home

LAC614: AP English Lang & & Comp (2012-2013)

CURRICULUM PROGRAM: Advanced Placement
COURSE TITLE: AP English Language & Composition
CALENDAR YEAR: 2012-2013
GRADE LEVEL: 11-12
CODE: LAC614
TYPE: GL,AP
CREDITS:
COURSE LENGTH: 36 weeks

About the Program:
AP English Language and Composition is designed for students willing to accept an intellectual challenge and is intended to engage higher order analytic and synthetic thinking and writing skills. Wide readings of recognized importance and styles from different time periods will provide students the opportunity to explore and appreciate trends in linguistic styles. In addition to reading primarily nonfiction materials, students may read poetry and fiction to determine the impact of a writer’s “linguistic and rhetorical choices.” Students will write in informal and formal contexts to become competent in their personal writing and proficient in expository, analytical, and argumentative assignments. Evaluation and use of primary and secondary sources in addition to learning multiple methods to cite sources will be learned in this course. Timed responses mirroring the demands of the AP exam will be a frequent form of evaluation. Though the system has an open enrollment policy, students should understand this is a college class taught in a high school classroom and is designed to culminate in the AP Language and Composition Exam. Those who are enrolled in AP Language and Composition may expect a more intense workload; the breadth, pace, and depth of material covered exceeds the standard English class. This course is the equivalent of an introductory college level composition class with college level requirements. It is intended to be both rigorous and challenging. Students are expected to take the AP exam at the end of the course.

Major Concepts/Content: Students will experience, interpret, and evaluate primarily nonfiction readings of recognized importance and styles from different time periods covering multiple disciplines. In addition, the critical examination of the contextual relationship among graphics and visual images to text and as stand-alone messages will be mastered. Readings will be challenging, complex, and rich; collegial discussions amongst the students will deepen their understanding of the use, structure, and impact of language embodied in a work.

Course Objectives: Students will:

  • Actively participate in group discussions and critique prose styles selected from a range of disciplines and rhetorical contexts written during various time periods.
  • Apply the writing process to interpret experience, evaluate, and emulate examples of high quality writing leading to the development of “stylistic maturity.”
  • Write expository, analytical, and argumentative assignments and manipulate compositions to account for varying audiences, contexts, and goals.
  • Use language effectively and cogently in both the personal and academic realms.
  • Critically examine the contextual relationship among graphics and visual images to text and as stand-alone messages.
  • Assess and incorporate primary and secondary sources into research projects and cite all sources appropriately.
  • Learn the critical skill of synthesizing information from their readings to produce a fresh perspective.

Course Philosophy: The class is an interactive learning community in which both student and instructor become deeply engaged in the reading, discussion, production, and analysis of prose from a variety of sources and time periods. Because this is an introductory college level course, students will read broadly from primarily nonfiction material. They will also exchange ideas and understandings with their peers, learn the critical skill of synthesizing information from their readings to produce a fresh perspective, and incorporate this skill in their writing. Both their writing and reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way “generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.” Risk taking and questioning are encouraged.

Course Notes: Weighted - Must Take AP Exam (+ indicated Weighted)