Support Offices
avain flu
Center for Early Dispute Resolution
 
Diversity Management & Equal Opportunity
 
DoDEA's Procurement Division
 
HR Regional Service Center
 
Information Technology Division
 
Logistics Division
 
Office of Communications
 
Office of General Counsel
 
Office of Investigations and Internal Review
 
Office of Safety and Security
 
Office of Small Business Programs
 
Regulations, Educational Support Policy & Legislation
 
Resource Management Division

Area Offices

DoDEA OSS: Avian Flu Update


office-2col-avianBird flu is an infection caused by avian (bird) influenza (flu) viruses. These flu viruses occur naturally among birds. Wild birds worldwide carry the viruses in their intestines, but usually do not get sick from them. However, bird flu is very contagious among birds and can make some domesticated birds, including chickens, ducks, and turkeys, very sick and kill them.

Bird flu viruses do not usually infect humans, but more than 100 confirmed cases of human infection with bird flu viruses have occurred since 1997.

Symptoms of bird flu in humans have ranged from typical flu-like symptoms (fever, cough, sore throat and muscle aches) to eye infections, pneumonia, severe respiratory diseases (such as acute respiratory distress), and other severe and life-threatening complications. The symptoms of bird flu may depend on which virus caused the infection.

An influenza pandemic is a global outbreak of disease that occurs when a new influenza A virus appears or "emerges" in the human population, causes serious illness, and then spreads easily from person to person worldwide. Pandemics are different from seasonal outbreaks or "epidemics" of influenza. Seasonal outbreaks are caused by subtypes of influenza viruses that already circulate among people, whereas pandemic outbreaks are caused by new subtypes, by subtypes that have never circulated among people, or by subtypes that have not circulated among people for a long time. Past influenza pandemics have led to high levels of illness, death, social disruption, and economic loss.

An influenza pandemic has the potential to cause more death and illness than any other public health threat. If a pandemic influenza virus with similar virulence to the 1918 strain emerged today, in the absence of intervention, it is estimated that 1.9 million Americans could die and almost 10 million could be hospitalized over the course of the pandemic, which may evolve over a year or more.

  • Pandemic Flu: Currently there is no pandemic flu in the world. An influenza pandemic is a global outbreak of disease that occurs when three conditions are met: a new influenza A virus appears or "emerges" in the human population, it causes serious illness in people, and it spreads easily from person to person worldwide.
  • Avian Flu: Bird flu is an infection caused by avian (bird) influenza (flu) viruses. These flu viruses occur naturally among birds.
  • Seasonal Flu: Seasonal influenza (often called "the flu") is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses and occurs every year. It can cause mild to severe illness. The best protection against seasonal flu is vaccination.

In the century past, we have experienced influenza pandemics three times: as recently as 1968 and 1957 and what has been called the Great Influenza in 1918, a pandemic that killed 40-50 million people worldwide. Although the timing, nature and severity of the next pandemic cannot be predicted with any certainty, preparedness planning is imperative to lessen the impact of a pandemic. Source: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services http://www.hhs.gov/

On November 18, 2005, the CDC reissued an "outbreak notice" containing interim guidance about Avian Influenza A (H5N1) for U.S. Citizens living abroad. The source for most of the content came from the National Center for Infectious Diseases, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine. That notice can be found at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian