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Antilles HS Celebrates African American Heritage Month

Activities for African American Heritage Month

Antilles High School
Fort Buchanan | February 6, 2017

AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

THEME 2017- The Crisis in Black Education

SOCIAL STUDIES COLLEGE AND CAREER
READINESS STANDARD:

Basic freedoms and rights and responsibilities of
citizens in a democratic republic

■■ Role
of the citizen in the community and nation and as a member of the global
community

■■ Civic
participation and engagement

■■ Respect
for diversity

■■ Struggle
for rights, access to citizenship rights, and universal human rights

COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS LITERACY SKILLS;

Using Primary Sources

CCR.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.5
Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an
explanation or analysis

CCR.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.9
Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and
secondary sources

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

The theme for 2017 focuses on the crucial role of education
in the history of African Americans. ASALH's founder Carter G. Woodson once
wrote that "if you teach the Negro that he has accomplished as much good as any
other race he will aspire to equality and justice without regard to race.". The
crisis in black education first began in the days of slavery when it was
unlawful for slaves to learn to read and write. Whether by laws, policies, or
practices, racially separated schools remained the norm in America from the
late nineteenth century well into our own time. Throughout the last quarter of
the twentieth century and continuing today, the crisis in black education has
grown significantly in urban neighborhoods where public schools lack resources,
endure overcrowding, exhibit a racial achievement gap, and confront policies
that fail to deliver substantive opportunities

Tragically, some poorly performing schools serve as
pipelines to prison for youths. Yet, African American history is rich in
centuries-old efforts of resistance to this crisis: the slaves' surreptitious
endeavors to learn; the rise of black colleges and universities after the Civil
War; unrelenting battles in the courts; the black history movement; the freedom
schools of the 1960s;and local community-based academic and mentorship
programs that inspire a love of learning and thirst for achievement. Addressing
the crisis in black education should be considered one of the most important
goals in America's past, present, and future.

DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES THROUGHOUT THE
MONTH
;

-Class Displays

-Museum Walk Activity

-DBQ Writing and Follow up discussions

-Roundtable Discussions

- African American Fact Check on PNN news station

-Guest Speaker Activity….Dr. Thomas Whittle (Crisis in Black
Education) during SS Classes

-Research Activities

-Library Display

NOTE: It is our hope
as a department to make our students aware of the value of their education and
how others less fortunate then themselves can also make a difference and become
valuable members to society.

 


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