Department of Defense Education Activity

Lejeune HS: Policies and Procedures

General Information

The Department of Defense (DoD), in collaboration with the National Center for Interstate Compacts and the Council of State Governments, has developed an interstate compact that addresses the educational transition issues of children of active duty military-connected families.  Currently, all 50 states and the District of Columbia participate in this interstate compact, which provides uniform policy for resolving the education transitional challenges experienced by military-connected children as they transition between schools.

It is estimated that the average military family moves nearly every two years during their active duty Service member’s career.  These frequent moves can cause children to miss out on curricular and extracurricular activities as well as face challenges with educational continuity, including meeting graduation requirements.  The Compact ensures that children of military families are afforded the same opportunities for educational success as other children and are not penalized or delayed in achieving their educational goals by inflexible administrative and bureaucratic practices.  States participating in the Compact work to coordinate graduation requirements, transfer of records, course placement, unique learning needs, assessments and other administrative policies.

If the principal permits a school to operate a limited open forum by maintaining a practice of allowing any single non-curriculum-related student group access to school facilities, the principal shall ensure that all of such student groups (including activities of religious nature) are permitted equal access to meet on school premises and use school facilities during non-instructional time.  Access to groups may be denied if the principal determines that a student or student group has or is likely to substantially interfere with good order or discipline or violate any Federal, state, or local law, or DoD or DoDEA regulation/policy.

For safety reasons, all visitors and volunteers must report to the school’s front office immediately upon entering the school. A visitor/volunteer is someone who is not a school employee or enrolled student and enters the school during operating hours. The school administration has the final determination on visitors/volunteers authorized to be at the school. When visiting, visitors/volunteers may go only to the approved area indicated as their destination when signing in at the front office. All visitors will receive an appropriate visitor’s badge, which is to be displayed conspicuously at all times while on school grounds. Any change to the designated location must be approved by the school’s front office before the visitor/volunteer can access a different location within the school. Upon finishing their visit, visitors/volunteers must check out at the front office, return the visitor’s badge, and exit the school. Parents are welcome to visit the school and classrooms to observe the school’s programs for brief periods of time that do not interfere with instruction. Approval by school personnel is required for this type of visitation.

DoDEA school administrators, in partnership with sponsors/family members, students, and military leaders, promote communication through the establishment of school boards to address issues (school initiatives, procedures and policies) locally. This is a system-wide way for parents to get involved in their child’s local school. Consult your child’s school to learn more about school boards.

This policy is currently being updated. Notification will be provided when the approved policy has been released.

Enrollment

Proof of Eligibility:  The sponsor does not need to be present at registration, as long as the parent or other adult registering the child has all the necessary paperwork, in accordance with DoDEA Regulation 1342.13, “Eligibility Requirements for Education of Elementary and Secondary School-Age Dependents in Overseas Areas,” September 20, 2006, as amended, and DoD Instruction 1342.26, “Eligibility Requirements for Minor Dependents to Attend Department of Defense Domestic Dependent Elementary and Secondary Schools (DDESS),” March 4, 1997. 

The following documents are necessary to complete the registration process:

  1. Proof of age;
  2. Medical records, including information on medical conditions, medications, and all dates and types of immunizations;
  3. Official documents to support eligibility (e.g., letter of employment, contract, permanent change of station [PCS] orders, etc.); and
  4. Proof of on-base residence (applies to students enrolling in DoD domestic schools).

Contact the registrar at your child’s school or to update your child’s information or visit your school's registration page for more information on enrollment. 

Students who enroll in DoDEA schools are required to meet specific immunization requirements (DoDEA Regulation 2942.01, “School Health Services,” September 2, 2016).  These requirements represent the minimum and do not necessarily reflect the optimal immunization status for a student.  Acceptable forms of official proof of immunization status may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Yellow international immunization records;
  2. State agency-generated immunization certificates;
  3. School-generated immunization certificates; and
  4. Physician, clinic or hospital-generated immunization records.

It is the responsibility of the sponsor/parent/guardian to provide their child’s most current immunization record at the time of enrollment and when immunizations are updated.  Parents of incoming students are allowed up to 30 days from the date of enrollment to obtain documentation of any missing required immunization(s).  If the missing required immunization is a series, then the first dose of the series must be administered, and documentation must be provided to the school within the required 30 days.  Students who have immunization(s) due during the school year will have 10 calendar days from the due date to receive their vaccine(s) and to submit documentation to the school.  The due date of a vaccine is on the date the student reaches the minimum recommended age for vaccine administration.

STUDENTS IN NON-COMPLIANCE AFTER 10 DAYS MAY BE DISENROLLED UNTIL PROOF OF COMPLIANCE OR APPROVED EXEMPTION IS PROVIDED.
  

Minimum Requirements

Content Area Course Requirements Standard Diploma Honors Diploma

English Language Arts

  • 1.0 credit (ELA 9)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 10)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 11)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 12)

 

*High school ELLs in ESOL for ELA courses (Levels I-V) may receive up to 2 ELA credits towards graduation requirements.

4.0 credits

4.0 credits

Social Studies

  • 1.0 credit (World History 9 or 10; Honors Integrated

World History 9 or 10; or AP World History-Modern)

  • 1.0 credit (U. S. History)
  •  0.5 credit (U. S. Government)
  •  0.5 credit (Social Studies elective)

3.0 credits

3.0 credits

Mathematics

  • 1.0 credit (Algebra)
  • 1.0 (Geometry)
  • 1.0 credit (Math course code 400 or above)
  • 1.0 credit (Algebra II

4.0 credits

4.0 credits

Science

  • 1.0 credit (Biology)
  • 1.0 credit (Chemistry
  • 1.0 credit (Physics)

3.0 credits

3.0 credits

World Language

  • 2.0 credits (World Language [WL] course)

Note: Sequential courses in the same language.

2.0 credits

2.0 credits

Career Technical Education (CTE)

  • 1.5 credits (CTE course offering)
  • 0.5 credit (Computer Technology CTE course)

2.0 credits

2.0 credits

Physical Education

  • 0.5 credit (Lifetime Sports)
  • 0.5 credit (Personal Fitness)
  • 0.5 credit (Activity & Nutrition or equivalent PE)

Note: Two years of JROTC taken in a DoDEA school fulfills the 0.5 credit requirement for Lifetime Sports.

1.5 credits

1.5 credits

Fine Arts

  • 1.0 credit (course in visual arts, music, theater, and/or humanities)

1.0 credit

1.0 credit

Health Education

  • 0.5 credit (Health Education course offering)

0.5 credit

0.5 credit

Honors Diploma

  • 0.5 credit in Economic Literacy in CTE, Social Studies, Science & Mathematics

        –

0.5 credit

Economic Literacy: Courses that meet this requirement

Business and Personal Finances, Management Foundations, Marketing Entrepreneurship, Financial Literacy, Financial Algebra, Business and Personal Finances, Management and International Business, Environmental Science (including AP), AP Human Geography, Economics (including AP), IB Economics, AP Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, AP Comparative Government and Politics

Summary

Minimum Total Credits

26.0 credits

26.0 credits

Required Courses

21.0 credits

21.5 credits

Elective Courses

5.0 credits

4.5 credits

AP and/or IB Courses and Requisite Exams

         –

4 courses

Minimum GPA

2.0 GPA

3.8 GPA

*AP and/or IB courses may be used to meet DoDEA requirements.

In Bahrain only, an IB diploma is awarded upon completion of the established requirements for the IB diploma. Students unable to successfully meet requirements for receipt of the IB diploma must meet all requirements for the standard or honors diploma to receive a DoDEA diploma.

A waiver for immunization exemption may be granted for medical or religious reasons. Philosophical exemptions are not permitted. The applicable DoD Command must provide guidance on the waiver process.

A statement from the child’s health care provider is required if an immunization cannot be administered because of a chronic medical condition wherein the vaccine is permanently contraindicated or because of natural immunity. The statement must document the reason why the child is exempt. This request for immunization exemption from specific vaccines due to vaccine contraindications or natural immunity must be completed and submitted to the school at the beginning of the child’s enrollment or when a vaccine is due. Request for exemption only needs to be completed one time for the duration of the child’s enrollment at the school.

If an immunization is not administered because of a parent’s religious beliefs, the parent must submit an exemption request in writing, stating that he or she objects to the vaccination based upon religious beliefs. The immunization waiver request must be completed and submitted to the school at the beginning of every school year. For students arriving after the school year has started, this request/written statement must be submitted at the initial enrollment and at the beginning of every school year.

During a documented outbreak of a vaccine-preventable disease (as determined by local DoD medical authorities), a student who is attending a DoDEA school program under an immunization waiver for that vaccine will be excluded from attending. This is for his or her protection and the safety of the other children and staff. The exclusion will remain in place until such time that the DoD Command determines that the outbreak is over and that it is safe for the student to return to school.

DoDEA Immunization Requirements

DoDEA Health Forms

Policy Reference:  Army Regulation 40-562, BUMEDINST 6230.15B, AFI 48-110_IP, CG COMDTINST M6230.4G, “Immunizations and Chemoprophylaxis for the Prevention of Infectious Diseases,” 7 October 2013

Kindergarten and grade 1 placements are determined by minimum age requirements, in accordance with Enclosure 2 of DoDEA Regulation 2000.03, “Student Grade Level Placement,” March 2, 2010. A student who will reach his or her fifth birthday on or before September 1 of the school year is eligible to be enrolled in kindergarten in DoDEA. In addition, a student who will reach his or her sixth birthday on or before September 1 of the school year is eligible to enroll in grade 1 in DoDEA. Placement in grades 2–8 is predicated upon completion of the preceding year. Students entering a DoDEA school (kindergarten through grade 8) from a non-American or host nation school will be placed in the grade level corresponding to their ages, assuming yearly progression from grades 1–8.

Grade-level status (grades 9, 10, 11, and 12) will be determined by the number of course credit units earned by the student, in accordance with Section 2 of DoDEA Regulation 2000.3, “Student Grade Level Placement,” March 2, 2010. Students entering grade 9 must have successfully completed grade 8 and/or been previously enrolled in grade 9 and earned less than 6 credits. Students entering grade 10 must have successfully completed grade 9 and earned a minimum of 6 course credits. Students entering grade 11 must have successfully completed grade 10 and earned a minimum of 12 course credits. Students entering grade 12 must have successfully completed grade 11 and earned a minimum of 19 course credits.

In accordance with DoDI 1342.29, “Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children,” January 31, 2019, for students transitioning from a sending school system to a DoDEA school, at the time of transition and regardless of the age of the student, the DoDEA school shall enroll the transitioning student in the same grade level as the student’s grade level (i.e. in kindergarten through grade 12) in the sending state’s local educational agency. For kindergarten, the student must have been enrolled in and attended kindergarten class in order to assure continued attendance in kindergarten in a DoDEA school. Students who have satisfactorily completed the prerequisite grade level in the sending school system will be eligible for enrollment in the next higher grade level in the DoDEA school, regardless of the student’s age.

All DoDEA students, including students with disabilities, English language learners (ELLs), and students with accommodation plans, should be afforded the opportunity to participate in the standard DoDEA secondary curriculum, as appropriate, based upon their individual circumstances.

Student records and transcripts may be requested from several different sources, depending upon the student’s last date of attendance or graduation date. Parents/sponsors of current and prospective elementary/middle/high school students should contact the school’s registrar directly for assistance. For further information, please visit the DoDEA Student Records Center. You may also consult with the counseling department at your child’s school for issues regarding student records.

An English language learner (ELL) is a student whose first language is not English and is in the process of acquiring English as an additional language. In accordance with DoDEA Regulation 2440.1, DoDEA’s English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Program is designed to teach ELLs to acquire English language and literacy proficiency through content. The ESOL Program builds students’ social, cultural, and academic skills so that identified ELLs succeed in an English language academic environment that provides equitable access to college- and career-ready opportunities as their English-speaking peers.

The ESOL Program involves teaching listening, speaking, reading, writing, and study skills at the appropriate developmental and English language proficiency levels. This is accomplished by teaching language through a standards-based, high-quality academic content that pursues the student’s orientation within the United States culture. The ESOL Program’s instruction can be delivered in a variety of settings and program configurations. The scope and amount of ESOL instruction provided is determined by the student’s age, grade level, academic needs, and an English language proficiency evaluation. DoDEA’s ELLs may receive instruction both through the ESOL Program and within the main classroom setting.

In accordance with the policy stated in DoDEA Regulation 2095.01, “School Attendance,” August 26, 2011, as amended, school attendance is mandatory.  All students are required to attend school to ensure continuity of instruction and that they successfully meet academic standards and demonstrate continuous educational progress.  School attendance is a joint responsibility between the parent or sponsor, student, classroom teacher, school personnel, and, in some cases, the Command.  Students with excessive school absences (or tardiness) shall be monitored by the Student Support Team to assist in the completion of all required work and successful mastery of course objectives.

Daily student attendance is identified based upon a quarter of the school day formula.  Students will be identified as present or absent, based on the following criteria:

  1. Absent up to 25% of the school day = absent one-quarter of the school day
  2. Absent between 26%–50% of the school day = absent one-half of the school day
  3. Absent 51%–75% of the school day = absent three-quarters of the school day
  4. Absent 76%–100% of the school day = full-day absence

DoDEA considers the following conditions to constitute reasonable cause for absence from school for reasons other than school-related activities:

  1. Personal illness;
  2. Medical, dental, or mental health appointment;
  3. Serious illness in the student’s immediate family;
  4. A death in the student’s immediate family or of a relative;
  5. Religious holiday;
  6. Emergency conditions such as fire, flood, or storm;
  7. Unique family circumstances warranting absence and coordinated with school administration;
  8. College visits that cannot be scheduled on non-school days; and
  9. A pandemic event.

Unexcused absences may result in school disciplinary actions.  An absence from school or a class without written verification from a parent or sponsor will be unexcused.  Student attendance is calculated based upon the date of enrollment in a DoDEA school, which may occur anytime during the school year.  Student attendance monitoring is designed to provide a continuum of intervention and services to support families and children in keeping children in school and combating truancy and educational neglect.  Parents should notify the school of their child’s absence 30 minutes after the start of the school day.  Too many unexcused absences may trigger the Student Support Team to convene.

More about DoDEA Attendance Policy

Please call the front office by 8:30 a.m. when you know your child will be absent or tardy.

The sponsor must provide the front office with a written explanation of each absence when the child returns to school. The sponsor's note, by itself,does not constitute an excused absence.

Parents will be informed of unexcused absences. Students will be required to make up all missed school assignments. Parents are strongly encouraged to work closely with their child's teachers to ensure all class assignments are completed in a timely manner.

Appointments or Illness

Students will not be released from school on the basis of a telephone call. Parents must sign-out and sign-in their children when taking them to appointments and back to school. When students are sent home because of illness, they are to be accompanied by their parent(s) or authorized guardian/emergency contact.

Release of Students Policy

During the school day, students will be released only to a parent or to the person named as the emergency contact on the registration form. The only exceptions will be:

  1. a signed note is received from the sponsor designating another adult to pick up the student or
  2. a military unit has designated someone to pick up the student when parents and emergency contacts could not be reached.

Appointments or Illness

Students will not be released from school on the basis of a telephone call. Parents must sign-out and sign-in their children when taking them to appointments and back to school. When students are sent home because of illness, they are to be accompanied by their parent(s) or authorized guardian/emergency contact.

Absence Notification

Parents are asked to call the front office when they know their child will be absent. The sponsor must provide the front office with a written explanation of each absence when the child returns to school. The sponsor's note, by itself,does not constitute an excused absence.

Parents will be informed of unexcused absences. Students will be required to make up all missed school assignments. Parents are strongly encouraged to work closely with their child's teachers to ensure all class assignments are completed in a timely manner.

Release of Students Policy

During the school day, students will be released only to a parent or to the person named as the emergency contact on the registration form. The only exceptions will be:

  1. A signed note is received from the sponsor designating another adult to pick up the student or
  2. A military unit has designated someone to pick up the student when parents and emergency contacts could not be reached.

The Principal may authorize an accelerated withdrawal of a student who must withdraw from school 20 or less instructional days prior to the end of a semester, in accordance with Section 3.1.d, of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1367.01, “High School Graduation Requirements and Policy,” [TBD]. Accelerated withdrawal will only be considered if the parent/sponsor presents PCS orders. The parent or sponsor must present verification of the date required for the student to depart from the school (e.g., PCS orders). All of the conditions of an accelerated study program outlined by the student’s teachers must be met prior to withdrawal in order for grades to be assigned and credit to be granted. Students who withdraw prior to the 20-day limitation of the accelerated withdrawal policy will receive “withdrawal” grades rather than final grades. In this case, the sponsor/parent should notify the school two weeks prior to the date of withdrawal.

DoDEA recognizes that home schooling is a sponsor’s right and may be a legitimate alternative form of education for the sponsor’s dependent(s). Home-school students who are eligible to enroll in a DoDEA-Europe, DoDEA-Pacific and DoDEA-Americas school are eligible to utilize DoDEA auxiliary services without being required to either enroll in or register for a minimum number of courses offered by the school. Eligible DoD home-school students using or receiving auxiliary services must meet the same eligibility and standards of conduct requirements applicable to students enrolled in the DoDEA school who use or receive the same auxiliary services. Any student, including eligible DoD dependent home-school students, who has not met the graduation requirements to earn a DoDEA diploma may not receive DoDEA commencement regalia, the DoDEA diploma, nor participate (walk) in a DoDEA commencement ceremony.

High School Graduation

A standard diploma is awarded upon completion of the following requirements, as stated in Sections 3.3, of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1367.01, “High School Graduation Requirements and Policy,” [TBD]:

  1. Minimum 2.0 GPA;
  2. Completion of 26.0 units of credit; and
  3. Completion of specific course requirements.

An honors diploma is awarded upon completion of the following additional requirements:

  1. Completion of all requirements for a standard diploma and 0.5 credit in economic history
  2. Minimum 3.8 GPA at the end of the second semester of the graduating year
  3. Earning a passing grade and taking the requisite exams in a minimum of four Advanced Placement (AP) exams and/or International Baccalaureate diploma (IB) in advanced-level courses.

DoDEA accepts the official courses, grades and earned credits of middle school (grades 7–8) and high school (grades 9–12) students who transfer to a DoDEA school from other DoDEA schools or who earn course credits in an accredited non-DoD system (public or private), correspondence, online, and/or home-school program. The accreditation for the sending school or school system must be from one of the six U.S. regional accrediting associations, one of the U.S. state education agencies, or by a public- or state-supported system of accreditation for public or private education programs in a foreign nation, in accordance with Section 4.7, of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1367.01. Please contact your child’s school for questions regarding course credit transfer process and approval.

Policy Reference:  DoDI 1342.29, “Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children,” January 31, 2017

Policy Reference:  DoDEA Procedural Guide 15-PGED-002, Graduation Requirements and Policy – Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children,” February 4, 2016

Report Card and Grading Information

At the beginning of each course or grade level, every DoDEA teacher shall make available information regarding grading policy and course requirements to parents and students.  This information will be provided to parents and students by the end of the first month of the school year or by the end of the first month of the semester in the case of a semester course.

If any student demonstrates unsatisfactory progress or achievement, teachers must notify parents with enough time to correct the deficiency.  Notification must occur as soon as unsatisfactory achievement is evident, and not later than the midpoint of the nine-week grading period.

Timely and accurate reporting of student progress shall be accomplished for students in grades 4–12, using the approved DoDEA Electronic Gradebook (EGB) System.  All assignments (e.g., quizzes, tests, examinations, homework, speeches, etc.) that are used to assess and report student progress shall be promptly evaluated and/or graded, posted in the EGB, and returned to the student.  The normal period of evaluation and posting should be no longer than ten calendar days from the day the assignment is collected, with reasonable exceptions for large projects.  At a minimum, one assignment or grade should be recorded per week in the EGB System.  To create an account and access the EGB System, please visit Gradespeed (https://dodea.gradespeed.net/gs/Default.aspx) for instructions.

A traditional letter grading system will be used for grades 4–12 report marks.

Grade Numerical Range Description

A

90 – 100

Excellent: Outstanding level of performance

B

80 – 89

Good: High level of performance

C

70 – 79

Average: Acceptable level of performance

D

60 – 69

Poor: Minimal level of performance

F (failing)

0 – 59

Failing (No credit awarded)

For purposes of calculating a student’s high school GPA, the following scales shall be used:

Unweighted Standard Scale Weighted Advanced Placement (with AP exam)

4.0

5.0

3.0

4.0

2.0

3.0

1.0

2.0

0

0

Gradespeed is the DoDEA adopted program for teachers' of grades 4 through 12 to submit and post grades into the Student Information System. The Gradespeed program offers many special features, including Parent Connection for teacher reporting, and teacher‐to‐parent communications. 

Gradespeed's Parent Connection gives parents online access to their child's grades via the web. Each parent can request his or her own account.  Students will be given a Gradespeed account by their school Educational Technologist.  Visit the DoDEA GradeSpeed page for more information about GradeSpeed and for instruction to create an account. The three links below are for Student, Parent and Teacher access.

Link to Gradespeed StudentConnectiongradespeed-parentTeacher Gradespeed

In accordance with the policies and procedures in DoDEA Regulation 1377.01, “Student Progress Reports,” September 4, 2018, it is DoDEA policy to issue a progress report every 9 weeks for any student present or enrolled for at least 20 instructional days or more in a marking period.  Any written comments by teachers on progress reports should be stated objectively.  The comments should be based on evidence about the student and should not represent opinions that cannot be supported by evidence

Achievement codes will be given at the end of the second, third and fourth marking periods for students in grades K–1.  Grades will be given at the end of each of the four marking periods for students in grades 2–12.  Achievement codes or grades on report cards will be determined by the degree to which students are achieving established program objectives or standards.  For students in grades K–12, unsatisfactory achievement of program objectives or standards will be reported to parents during each marking period as soon as evident, but no later than the midpoint of the nine-week grading period to allow sufficient time for a student to correct the problem.

All DoDEA schools should encourage parents to meet with their child’s teacher for parent-teacher conferences.  Parent-teacher conferences allow parents the opportunity to ask questions about their child’s classes or progress in school.  Parent-teacher conferences are also a great way to discuss how parents and teachers can work together to help students perform at their best in school.  Parents/sponsors who plan to attend a parent-teacher conference scheduled by the teacher or school should inquire on the amount of time allowed before attending.  If more time is required or the parent/sponsor wants to meet with the teacher again, the parent/sponsor should notify the teacher at the end of the conference.  Please contact your child’s school for details regarding scheduling of parent-teacher conferences.  DoDEA encourages all communication to take place through official school email accounts.

All DoDEA students in grades or programs identified for system-wide assessments shall be included in the DoDEA Comprehensive Assessment System (DoDEA-CAS), in accordance with DoDEA Regulation 1301.01, “Comprehensive Assessment System,” October 4, 2018.  Students who have been identified as having disabilities or are ELLs shall participate using either the standard DoDEA assessments, with or without reasonable and appropriate accommodations, or through the use of the appropriate DoDEA alternate assessment, as per their Individual Education Plan (IEP), 504 Accommodation Plan, or English Learner Plan.  All assessments selected for use within DoDEA shall:

  1. Align to clearly defined standards and objectives within the content domain being tested
  2. Be valid and reliable and controlled for bias
  3. Be one of several criteria used for making major decisions about student performance/achievement.

The results of each assessment shall be used as one component of the DoDEA-CAS for major decisions concerning a student’s future learning activities within the classroom setting.   

For more information about the DoDEA-CAS, including the testing administration matrix, test descriptions, and testing calendar, please refer to: https://www.dodea.edu/assessments/index.cfm.

Special Education

The purpose of special education is to enable students to successfully develop to their fullest potential by providing a free appropriate public education in compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).Special education is specially designed instruction, support and services provided to students with an identified disability who require an instructional program that meets their unique learning needs.  The purpose of special education is to enable these students to successfully develop to their fullest potential by providing a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), as implemented by DoD Manual (DoDM) 1342.12, “Implementation of Early Intervention and Special Education Services to Eligible DoD Dependents,” June 17, 2015.

In DoDEA, special education and related services are available to eligible students, ages 3 through 21 years of age.  To be eligible for special education:

  1. The child must have an identified disability;
  2. The disability must adversely (negatively) affect the child's educational performance; and
  3. The child must require a specially designed instructional program.

If found eligible for special education and related services, DoDEA students are provided FAPE in accordance with an IEP, with services delivered in the least restrictive environment and with procedural safeguards, in accordance with the requirements of DoDM 1342.12.

Please contact your child’s school to discuss your concerns if you suspect your child may have a disability and be in need of special education services.  The Case Study Committee chairperson will provide you with specific details relating to the evaluation process and can explain eligibility requirements further. 

Reporting Abuse Neglect Suicide Risk and Threats

In accordance with the policy in DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1356.01, “Family Advocacy Program Process for Reporting Incidents of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect,” November 5, 2018, all DoDEA personnel will participate in the identification and reporting of incidents of child abuse and neglect.  School personnel shall report all suspected or alleged child abuse to the local Family and Advocacy Program (FAP) office, child welfare service agency (if available) and their immediate supervisor within 24 hours.  All employees shall cooperate with the FAP process.  The DoD FAP provides for the identification, treatment and prevention of child abuse and neglect.

School Counseling Services

DoDEA school counselors provide comprehensive counseling programs to all students in grades K–12, in accordance with DoDEA Regulation 2946.1, “School Counseling Services,” July 13, 2009, and DoDEA Manual 2946.2, “Department of Defense Education Activity School Counseling Services,” January 1, 2006.  Counseling programs are designed to foster a foundation for lifelong learning by removing barriers to students’ academic success.  Early identification and intervention of students’ academic and social/emotional needs is essential in removing barriers to learning and promoting academic growth.  School counselors provide direct and indirect student services and curricular activities to increase the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for students to achieve their potential academically, socially, emotionally, and physically for life, college, and career readiness.

Elementary school counseling programs are crucial in supporting students’ attitudes and personal views toward school, self, peers, and social groups.  In elementary grades, school counseling programs support and provide education on prevention and intervention services, promoting positive academic skills, career awareness, and social-emotional development — skills students need to be competent and confident learners. 

Secondary school counseling programs are designed to meet the rapidly changing needs of students in grades 6–12, while preparing them for high school and beyond.  College and career exploration and planning are emphasized at the secondary level.  As middle school students learn to manage more independence and responsibilities, school counseling programs are designed to connect learning to practical application in life and work, support personal/social skills, and foster effective learning/study skills. 

High school counseling programs are designed to foster student preparation and readiness for successful college and career pathways after high school.  All secondary students create and manage a four- to six-year plan with their counselor.  The four- to six-year plan is managed in Choices360 and is designed to teach students how to create and attain their graduation, college, and career goals, while taking into account their interests, aptitudes, and graduation requirements.

 

Please contact your school counselor for additional information regarding the school counseling program.

School Health Service

DoDEA School Health Services aims to optimize learning by fostering student wellness.  The school nurse serves as the health service expert, providing health care to students/staff and implementing interventions that address both actual and potential health and safety conditions.  The school nurse collaborates with the school administrator to promote the health and academic success of students and serves as the liaison between the school, community, and health care systems.  This collaborative effort creates opportunities to build capacity for students’ self-care, resilience, and learning. 

The school nurse’s responsibilities include:

  1. Providing leadership in promoting personal and environmental health and safety by managing communicable diseases, monitoring immunizations, and providing consultation and health-related education to students and staff to promote school health and academic success; 
  2. Providing quality health care and intervening with actual and potential health problems through health screenings, health assessments, and nursing interventions, including the development of health care and emergency care plans to enable students to safely and fully participate in school;
  3. Providing case management services to direct care for students with chronic health conditions in order to ensure their safety and increase their access to the educational program; and
  4. Collaborating with school and community-based resources to reduce health-related barriers to student learning, improve access to health care and develop school-community partnerships to support academic achievement and student success.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Students are expected to dress in a manner that complies with the school’s dress code policy as directed in DoDEA Administrative Instruction 2051.02, “Students Rights and Responsibilities,” April 17, 2012.  Please refer to your school’s Web site or school handbook for specific dress code policy.

School Safety

School security is a national concern. Throughout the United States, youth crime and violence threaten to undermine the safety of our students' learning environment. Since the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) represents a cross-section of Americana, all partners in our community education process must understand and support the principles underlying a safe and secure learning environment as applied to creating a safe school. The underlying principles all relate to student rights to a safe and secure learning environment free from the threat or fear of physical violence; free from drugs, alcohol, weapons and other prohibited items; free from hazing, bullying or intimidation; and free from gang or criminal activity.

The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) follows guidance for the Department of Defense and also issues instructions and policies concerning our schools. DoDEA Regulation 2051.1, Disciplinary Rules and Procedures outlines student conduct expectations and disciplinary consequences that may be invoked when the conduct of a student poses an immediate threat to his/her safety or the safety of others in the school. These student conduct expectations apply to student conduct that is:

  • related to a school activity while on school property
  • while en route between school and home, to include school buses
  • during lunch period
  • during or while going to or coming from all school-sponsored events/activities that affect the missions or operations of the school or district including field trips, sporting events, stadium assemblies, and evening school-related activities.

Violence, threats of violence, prohibited items, gang or criminal behavior, and bullying or intimidation will not be tolerated. Perpetrating a bomb threat or complicity in the act is grounds for expulsion. Additionally, local military regulations and laws may authorize criminal prosecution for such actions. Therefore, it is incumbent upon all community education partners - students, parents, military leaders, administrators, faculty and staff - to understand the serious nature of actions violating the principle student freedoms and the scope of authority over infractions as outlined in The DoDEA Disciplinary Rules and Procedures. The administration at each school is responsible for the management of student behavior.

These are politically driven acts of violence. The chances of a civil disturbance or terrorist act occurring in or around the school are very low. Should a civil disturbance or act of terrorism occur at the school, the following actions will be taken:

  1. The school administrator will be notified immediately.
  2. A school administrator will notify the Security Police or designated base Command Post.
  3. The school will follow all procedures and instructions of the Command Post. Administrators will coordinate the implementation of the DoD Force Protection Condition (FPCON) System measures with local security officials or3 5base commanders to ensure the measures are appropriate with the measures contained in the base FPCON plan. A list of the FPCON conditions is listed in DoDEA Reg. 4700.1, Enclosure 3.

DoDEA has implemented action-based standard response protocols (i.e., lockout, lockdown, evacuate, and shelter) that can be performed during any emergency incident.

lockout logoLockout is directed when there is a threat or hazard outside of the school.  Use the mass notification system or public address system, stating: “Lockout! Secure the perimeter.”  Who actually conducts this task will vary based upon the school and incident taking place.

lockdown logoLockdown is called when there is a threat or hazard inside the school building.  Use the mass notification system or public address system, stating: “Lockdown! Locks, Lights, Out of Sight!”  Who actually conducts this task will vary based upon the school and incident taking place; however, all school staff shall have the ability to call for a lockdown.  Contact local emergency services, or 911, as appropriate.

evacuate logoAn Evacuation is called when there is a need to move students from one facility to another.  The action will vary based upon the type of evacuation.  Other directions may be invoked during an evacuation, and student and staff should be prepared to follow specific instructions given by staff or first responders.

shelter logoShelter is called when the need for personal protection is necessary.  Hazards that could generate the need to Shelter include tornado, earthquake, tsunami, and a hazardous materials incident.  Use the mass notification system or public address system, stating: “Shelter [identifying the hazard]!”  This command is typically called by the DoDEA designated official but may be called by students, teachers or first responders.

The Standard Response Protocols are incorporated into the school’s Force Protection Plan.  For more information on the Standard Response Protocols and how they apply within DoDEA, refer to DoDEA Administrative Instruction 5205.02, Volume 6, “DoDEA Force Protection Program:  Standard Response Protocols,” July 24, 2018.

In accordance with our antiterrorism/force protection plan, the school will be evacuated unless otherwise determined by the command and our district office. In cases where the school has to evacuate the premises due to any safety concerns,the students and staff will evacuate to designated locations away from the threat. If we have to leave the school area and/or send students home we will make every effort to contact each sponsor. During the time of any evacuation, all students will remain with their teachers. If information is received from our district office or from the Command Post to send students home, the school will then release the student(s) to the parent/guardian provided proper identification has been presented. We appreciate your cooperation during times such as these. Again, it is imperative that the school has updated contact information in case of any type of emergency. Please contact the school office to ensure all contact numbers are updated and current.

Emergency school closure occurs when unforeseen circumstances such as broken water pipes, flooding, loss of power,severe weather, etc., warrant closure to be initiated during non-school hours. The decision to close the school is made through input from the administrators, our superintendent, and the Commander. An announcement of the closure will be broadcast on TV and/or radio, AdHoc, and through the base command units.

The AdHoc System allows for each school to contact all of their parents and/or staff with one phone message through an automatic dialing system. At the District level it allows a message to be sent to all parents and/or staff in the same method. This allows greater security and sharing of information with parents and staff. There is a Point of Contact (POC) at each location that has the necessary codes to access the system.

There are situations in which school may be canceled during school hours. Once again, this decision is made by the individuals stated above. Once the decision has been made to release students, staff members will alert all classrooms.Students who ride the bus will be released to board the bus at a set time. For those students who walk, ride a bike, or are picked up, they may be released once their parent/guardian has been contacted and agree with that process. If we are unable to reach a student's parent/guardian by the time teachers are released, the teacher will bring them to the office and the office staff will assist in contacting the parent. For these emergencies STUDENTS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO LEAVE SCHOOL GROUNDS WITHOUT THEIR PARENT/GUARDIAN BEING NOTIFIED. As stated before,please ensure all contact numbers are updated at all times with both your child's teacher and the school office.

Fire drills are conducted once each week during the first four weeks of school, and once each month thereafter. A fire evacuation plan is posted in each classroom. All students receive specific instruction and participate in the scheduled fire evacuation drills.

Fire Alarm Pull Switches

If a student intentionally pulls a fire alarm switch, they are subject to a probable suspension from school. The student will be reported to the military Fire Department and parents will be notified immediately. Pulling of the switches will not be tolerated and disciplinary action will be taken.

Student Conduct and Discipline

Management of student behavior is a responsibility shared by students, sponsors/parents/guardians, teachers, and the military command and school communities in general, in accordance with Enclosure 2 of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 2051.02, “Student Rights and Responsibilities,” April 17, 2012.  Student behavioral management consists of teaching and reinforcing positive student attitudes and behaviors.  Students shall treat teachers, administrators, and other school staff with courtesy, fairness, and respect; and teachers, administrators, and other school staff shall treat students with courtesy, fairness, and respect.  All students will be disciplined in a fair and appropriate manner.  School administrators shall operate and maintain a safe school environment that is conducive to learning.  School administration will ensure prompt investigation and response to incidents or complaints involving students made by students, parents, teachers, or DoDEA staff members. 

In accordance with the policy stated in DoDEA Regulation 2051.1, “Disciplinary Rules and Procedures,” March 23, 2012, as amended, discipline shall be progressively and fairly administered.  Disciplinary actions include, but are not limited to, verbal reprimands, conferences, detention, time-out, alternative in-school placements, school service programs, community service and counseling programs.  Other behavior management techniques will be considered prior to resorting to more formal disciplinary actions that remove a student from school for a suspension (short or long term).  Long-term suspension or expulsion following a first offense may be considered when a student poses an immediate threat to his or her safety or the safety of others (e.g., offenses involving firearms or other weapons, fighting or violence, or the possession, use, or sale of drugs).  Additional rules and procedures can be reviewed in DoDEA Regulation 2051.1.

In the wake of school violence throughout the world, it is important to analyze the causes of violence and implement preventive measures to assure that every student and adult will feel secure in the school environment. DoDEA implements a system-wide Bully Prevention program as a part of the Safe Schools and Character Education program.

Stop Bullying now

Bullying is defined as a means to have power over another and it takes many forms: physical, verbal, and indirect such as gossip and isolation. Bullying leaves long-lasting scars for its victims. Bullies have a higher incidence of antisocial behavior, domestic violence and crime as adults. Society pays a heavy toll for tolerating bullying behavior and bullies.

In DoDEA schools and community, bullying will not go unchallenged and will not be tolerated. All students, staff members, parents and the community play vital roles to insure our children are not bullied, do not act as bullies, and will not allow others to bully. Our schools have a moral obligation to provide our students and the school community with the proper information, prevention strategies, and defenses to create a safe, accepting and caring environment for all.

DoDEA's Bullying Awareness and Prevention Program

Technology

Each student, together with the student’s parent or guardian (if applicable), shall acknowledge and sign Form 700, “Use of DoDEA Internet and Use of Information Technology Resources,” before he or she is assigned a user account.  In accordance with Enclosure 4 of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 6600.01, “Computer Access and Internet Policy,” February 16, 2010, the following are required of all students:

  1. Students shall use DoDEA information technology (IT) resources, including computers, electronic mail, and internet access, only in support of education and for research consistent with the educational objectives of DoDEA; 
  2. Students shall respect and adhere to all of the rules governing access to, and use of, DoDEA’s IT resources; 
  3. Students shall be polite in all electronic communication;
  4. Students shall use courteous and respectful language and/or images in their messages to others;
  5. Students shall not swear, use vulgarities, or use harsh, abusive, sexual, or disrespectful language and/or images;
  6. Students who misuse DoDEA IT resources are subject to disciplinary measures; and
  7. Students’ accounts will be deactivated upon transition out of a DoDEA school.

The signed agreement (Form 700) is to be retained in the administrative office at the student’s school for the duration of the student’s enrollment.  A copy will be provided to the student and, if applicable, the student’s parent or guardian.

Student Transportation

Student transportation is defined as the transportation of students from their assigned bus stop to school at the beginning of their school day, during the mid-day and for return to their assigned bus stop at the end of the normal scheduled school day.  DoDEA principals are responsible for monitoring student loading/unloading zones when students are coming and going from school sites, including administering discipline.  A school bus or any device operating to provide student transportation will function as an extension of the school.  The walking distance for students in grade 6 and below should not exceed one mile from the student’s primary residence to the school or designated bus stop.  Students in grades 7–12 may walk up to 1.5 miles from their primary residence to the school or designated bus stop.  These distances may be slightly expanded or contracted to conform to natural boundaries such as housing areas or neighborhoods.  In locations having middle schools, which include grade 6 (i.e., grades 6–8), the walking distance criteria shall be the same as the criteria for grades 7–12.  

Transportation is not authorized to take students to their homes or to eating facilities for their mid-day meal.  No other transportation between the assigned bus stop and the school will be charged to commuting transportation unless stated in a special education student’s IEP and/or required by Section 504 guidelines.  “Curb-to-curb” only applies to students with disabilities who require such service as documented in the student’s IEP.  DoDEA District Superintendents, in coordination with the District Logistics Chief and the supporting military installation commanders, will establish a commuting area to determine eligibility for transportation of dependent students.

Office of DoDEA Policy

The Policy Team of OPLP administers and operates the DoDEA Issuance Program, the Issuance Focal Point Working Group, and facilitates DoD-level issuance coordination for DoDEA.

Policy and Legislation