Department of Defense Education Activity

Cyber Privacy

Now more than ever, we spend increasing amounts of time on the Internet. With every social media account you sign up for, every picture you post, and status you update, you are sharing information about yourself with the world. It is important to attend to your cyber footprint and reputation.
   🔒 Be proactive and share with care, because even if you delete a post or picture from your profile seconds after posting it, chances are someone still saw it. Limit what information you post on social media. Remember, there is no ‘Delete’ button on the Internet.
   🔒 Update your privacy settings. Set the privacy and security settings to your comfort level for information sharing.
Disable geotagging, which allows anyone to see where you are—and where you aren’t—at any given time. Keep Social Security numbers, account numbers, and passwords private, as well as specific information about yourself, such as your full name, address, birthday, and even vacation plans.
   🔒 Speak Up! This is your online community.  Report suspicious, harassing or bullying activity to your social media platform. Work with them to possibly block harassing users. Also, report an incident if you’ve been a victim of cybercrime; this will help protect others in your online community.
Visit staysafeonline.org to learn more.

Now, What Do We Mean By Privacy?

Cyber Privacy - "Privacy" and "Security" are not the same, however, they are often used interchangeably because they are related. Privacy has to do with the Rights that someone has when controlling access to their Private information. Security pertains to How your personal information is protected. Data breaches are Security problems that may lead to Privacy infringements. However, such breaches do not always affect both Privacy and Security.

DISCLAIMER: Links and video references external to this site do not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favor by the United States federal government as a whole.

 

Social Media

Social media Now more than ever, consumers spend increasing amounts of time on the internet. With every social media account you sign up for, every picture you post, and status you update, you are sharing information about yourself with the world.

How can you be proactive and “Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart”? Take these simple steps to connect with confidence and safely navigate the social media world.

  • Limit what information you post on social media — from personal addresses to where you like to grab coffee.
  • If a friend posts something about you that makes you uncomfortable or you think is inappropriate, let them know.
  • Work with your social media platform to report and possibly block harassing users.
  • Set the privacy and security settings to your comfort level for information sharing. Disable geotagging, which allows anyone to see where you are — and where you aren’t — at any given time.

For more tips, download the Social Media Cybersecurity tip sheet.

Online Privacy concerns Who You Are & What You Do. Who you are is your personally identifiable information (PII)

Now, what you do are the searches you perform, the websites you visit, the articles you read, even what you buy online. This data is valuable and can be tracked by advertisers, technology firms, and other companies.  Learn more by downloading the Online Privacy tip sheet.

 

Privacy and the Exceptions

Your Privacy is not an Absolute Right

DISCLAIMER: Links and video references external to this site do not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favor by the United States federal government as a whole.

 

Identity thefts and internet scams

Today’s technology allows us to connect around the world, to bank and shop online, and to control our televisions, homes, and cars from our smartphones. With this added convenience comes an increased risk of identity theft and internet scams. #BeCyberSmart on the internet — at home, at school, at work, on mobile devices, and on the go.

Download the Identity Thefts and Internet Scams tip sheet.

 

 

Vishing & Private Information

Vishing is the fraudulent practice of making phone calls or leaving voice messages purporting to be from reputable companies in order to induce individuals to reveal personal information, such as bank details and credit card numbers.

 

Reminder: Be careful with how you share your personally identifiable information (PII)

Contact IT Customer Support Services for additional support (VPN & CAC required).
Contact: Nicole McNealy, IT Communications, for questions about this page
Denotes alink that requires CAC Authentication