Department of Defense Education Activity

DoDEA VS: Policies and Procedures

Search:

General Information

For safety reasons, all visitors and volunteers must report to the school’s front office immediately upon entering the school.

Due to COVID-19, schools are currently minimizing volunteers/visitors in the classroom.

A visitor/volunteer is someone who is not a school employee or enrolled student and enters the school during operating hours. The school administration has the final determination on visitors/volunteers authorized to be at the school. When visiting, visitors/volunteers may go only to the approved area indicated as their destination when signing in at the front office. All visitors will receive an appropriate visitor’s badge, which is to be displayed conspicuously at all times while on school grounds. Any change to the designated location must be approved by the school’s front office before the visitor/volunteer can access a different location within the school. Upon finishing their visit, visitors/volunteers must check out at the front office, return the visitor’s badge, and exit the school. Parents are welcome to visit the school and classrooms to observe the school’s programs for brief periods of time that do not interfere with instruction. Approval by school personnel is required for this type of visitation.

Learn more about volunteering at your school's Get Involved page.

Enrollment

Proof of Eligibility: The sponsor does not need to be present at registration, as long as the parent or other adult registering the child has all the necessary paperwork, in accordance with DoDEA Regulation 1342.13, “Eligibility Requirements for Education of Elementary and Secondary School-Age Dependents in Overseas Areas,” September 20, 2006, as amended, and DoD Instruction 1342.26, “Eligibility Requirements for Minor Dependents to Attend Department of Defense Domestic Dependent Elementary and Secondary Schools (DDESS),” March 4, 1997. 

The following documents are necessary to complete the registration process:

  1. Proof of age;
  2. Medical records, including information on medical conditions, medications, and all dates and types of immunizations;
  3. Official documents to support eligibility (e.g., letter of employment, contract, permanent change of station [PCS] orders, etc.); and
  4. Proof of on-base residence (applies to students enrolling in DoD domestic schools).

Contact the registrar at your child’s school to update your child’s information or visit your school's registration page for more information on enrollment. 

In accordance with the policy stated in DoDEA Regulation 2095.01, “School Attendance,” August 26, 2011, as amended, school attendance is mandatory. All students are required to attend school to ensure continuity of instruction and that they successfully meet academic standards and demonstrate continuous educational progress. School attendance is a joint responsibility between the parent or sponsor, student, classroom teacher, school personnel, and, in some cases, the Command. Students with excessive school absences (or tardiness) shall be monitored by the Student Support Team to assist in the completion of all required work and successful mastery of course objectives.

Daily student attendance is identified based upon a quarter of the school day formula. Students will be identified as present or absent, based on the following criteria:

  1. Absent up to 25% of the school day = absent one-quarter of the school day
  2. Absent between 26%–50% of the school day = absent one-half of the school day
  3. Absent 51%–75% of the school day = absent three-quarters of the school day
  4. Absent 76%–100% of the school day = full-day absence

DoDEA considers the following conditions to constitute reasonable cause for absence from school for reasons other than school-related activities:

  1. Personal illness;
  2. Medical, dental, or mental health appointment;
  3. Serious illness in the student’s immediate family;
  4. A death in the student’s immediate family or of a relative;
  5. Religious holiday;
  6. Emergency conditions such as fire, flood, or storm;
  7. Unique family circumstances warranting absence and coordinated with school administration;
  8. College visits that cannot be scheduled on non-school days; and
  9. A pandemic event.

Unexcused absences may result in school disciplinary actions. An absence from school or a class without written verification from a parent or sponsor will be unexcused. Student attendance is calculated based upon the date of enrollment in a DoDEA school, which may occur anytime during the school year. Student attendance monitoring is designed to provide a continuum of intervention and services to support families and children in keeping children in school and combating truancy and educational neglect. Parents should notify the school of their child’s absence 30 minutes after the start of the school day.  Too many unexcused absences may trigger the Student Support Team to convene.

More about DoDEA Attendance Policy (dodea.edu/attendance)

The Principal may authorize an accelerated withdrawal of a student who must withdraw from school 20 or less instructional days prior to the end of a semester, in accordance with Section 3.1.d, of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1367.01, “High School Graduation Requirements and Policy,” [TBD]. Accelerated withdrawal will only be considered if the parent/sponsor presents PCS orders. The parent or sponsor must present verification of the date required for the student to depart from the school (e.g., PCS orders). All of the conditions of an accelerated study program outlined by the student’s teachers must be met prior to withdrawal in order for grades to be assigned and credit to be granted. Students who withdraw prior to the 20-day limitation of the accelerated withdrawal policy will receive “withdrawal” grades rather than final grades. In this case, the sponsor/parent should notify the school two weeks prior to the date of withdrawal.

While much of student learning occurs at times outside of a traditional class day, it is important that students remain in step with the assignment schedule. Courses are not self-paced. The assignment schedule posted in each course provides a pacing guide for students to complete their necessary coursework. Broken into weekly “chunks,” each assignment schedule provides required due dates, direction for student independent work, and for student-teacher collaboration during live sessions.

Depending upon grade level, students may be required to attend live, synchronous instruction with their teacher. Synchronous meeting times can be found on the course specific weekly assignment schedule provided in each course.

For those students who are unable to attend a scheduled live session, they should refer to the recording of the session posted in the course.  

If a student knows in advance that he/she will miss a live session or will be absent for the day, the student or parent should contact the teacher who will provide instructions for addressing the missed session.

All requests for accelerated withdrawal must go through the local brick and mortar school. The local school facilitator or counselor must immediately notify DVS administration or counselor when a student is approved for acceleration.

  • DVS administration/counselors will notify applicable DVS instructors.
  • The DVS instructor(s) will then provide the student with the course requirements to complete the course by the acceleration date.
  • The student is required to meet the requirements of the acceleration plan by the appropriate deadline so that a grade can be assigned.

Students enrolled through the NDSP or Domestic Transition Program who are preparing to transfer out of the DVS must advise their DVS counselor.

  • Upon approval of the DVS principal an acceleration plan will be developed by DVS instructors.
  • The student is required to meet the requirements of the acceleration plan by the appropriate deadline so that a grade can be assigned.

DoDEA Administrative Instruction (AI) 2000.1 (Sec 7.D.1) proivdes direction for when withdrawals may occur and what notations are required for student withdrawal. These instructions apply to all students enrolled in DVS courses regardless of eligibility upon which they are enrolled.

  • If a student withdraws from a course on or before the 10th school day of the semester, there will be no notation on the transcript.
  • If a student withdraws between the 11th and 19th school day of the semester, then a grade of WP (Withdrew Passing) or WF (Withdrew Failing) is noted as the grade earned at the time of withdrawal.
  • Courses may not be dropped after 20 days into the school quarter.
  • If a student withdraws prior to the end of the quarter tuition is charged through the end of the quarter. For more information, please contact the DVS at the appropriate email address for your region: DVS Americas, DVS Europe, DVS Pacific.

Student requests to withdraw from a course(s) for students enrolled in DoDEA schools are processed through the DVS Withdrawal Workflow in the Student Information System (SIS) and can be initiated by a local DoDEA school counselor any time within the official DoDEA drop period.

  • A student requesting withdrawal should discuss this decision with his/her local school and/or DVS counselor prior to submitting their request for withdrawal.
  • Local DoDEA schools are not able to withdraw students from DVS courses in the SIS.

Student requests to withdraw from a course(s) for those enrolled through the NDSP or Domestic Transition Program are processed by a DVS school counselor any time within the official DoDEA drop period.

High School Graduation

A DoDEA standard diploma is awarded upon completion of the following requirements at the end of the second semester of the graduating year.

  1. A minimum 2.0 GPA.
  2. Completion of 26.0 units of credit.
  3. Completion of specific course requirements published annually in the graduation requirements DTM corresponding with their 9th grade entrance year.

A DoDEA honors diploma is awarded upon completion of the following additional requirements at the end of the second semester of the graduating year:

  1. Completion of all requirements for a standard diploma and additional course requirements published annually in the graduation requirements DTM.
  2. Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.8 at the end of the eighth semester or at the end of the semester in which they graduate early in accordance with Section 3.1.c.
  3. Earn a passing grade in a minimum of four (4) AP courses and/or IB Diploma Program in advanced level courses. To meet this requirement through the IB Diploma Program, it is required that students successfully complete the full two (2) years of IB Diploma Program course work.

Students entering 9th grade during SY 2018-19

Class of 2022
Minimum Requirements
Content Area Course Requirements Standard Diploma Honors Diploma
English Language Arts
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 9)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 10)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 11)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 12)
*High school ELLs in ESOL for ELA courses (Levels I-V) may receive up to 2 ELA credits towards graduation requirements.
4.0 credits 4.0 credits
Social Studies
  • 1.0 credit (World History 9 or 10; Honors Integrated
World History 9 or 10; or AP World History-Modern)
  • 1.0 credit (U. S. History)
  • 0.5 credit (U. S. Government)
  • 0.5 credit (Social Studies elective)
3.0 credits 3.0 credits
Mathematics
  • 1.0 credit (Algebra)
  • 1.0 (Geometry)
  • 1.0 credit (Math course code 400 or above)
  • 1.0 credit (Algebra II)
4.0 credits 4.0 credits
Science
  • 1.0 credit (Biology)
  • 1.0 credit (Chemistry or Physics)
  • 1.0 credit (Science elective)
Note: Physics Applications and Chemistry Applications in the Community meet requirements.
3.0 credits 3.0 credits
World Language
  • 2.0 credits (World Language course)
Note: Sequential courses in the same language.
2.0 credits 2.0 credits
Career Technical Education (CTE)
  • 1.5 credits (CTE course offering)
  • 0.5 credit (Computer Technology CTE course)
2.0 credits 2.0 credits
Physical Education
  • 0.5 credit (Lifetime Sports)
  • 0.5 credit (Personal Fitness)
  • 0.5 credit (Activity & Nutrition or equivalent PE)
Note: Two years of JROTC taken in a DoDEA school fulfills the 0.5 credit requirement for Lifetime Sports.
1.5 credits 1.5 credits
Fine Arts
  • 1.0 credit (course in visual arts, music, theater, and/or humanities)
1.0 credit 1.0 credit
Health Education
  • 0.5 credit (Health Education course offering)
0.5 credit 0.5 credit
Honors Diploma
  • 0.5 credit in Economic Literacy in CTE, Social Studies, Science & Mathematics
0.5 credit
Economic Literacy: Courses that meet this requirement The following courses meet this requirement: Economics, AP Human Geography, Financial Literacy, Environmental Science, AP Macro or AP Micro Economics, AP Environmental Science, Business Personal Finance, Management & International Business, and Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
Summary
Minimum Total Credits 26.0 credits 26.0 credits
Required Courses 21.0 credits 21.5 credits
Elective Courses 5.0 credits 4.5 credits
AP and/or IB Courses 4 courses
Minimum GPA 2.0 GPA 3.8 GPA
*AP and/or IB courses may be used to meet DoDEA requirements.

 

Students entering 9th grade during SY 2019-20

Class of 2023
Minimum Requirements
Content Area Course Requirements Standard Diploma Honors Diploma
English Language Arts
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 9)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 10)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 11)
  • 1.0 credit (ELA 12)
*High school ELLs in ESOL for ELA courses (Levels I-V) may receive up to 2 ELA credits towards graduation requirements.
4.0 credits 4.0 credits
Social Studies
  • 1.0 credit (World History 9 or 10; Honors Integrated
World History 9 or 10; or AP World History-Modern)
  • 1.0 credit (U. S. History)
  • 0.5 credit (U. S. Government)
  • 0.5 credit (Social Studies elective)
3.0 credits 3.0 credits
Mathematics
  • 1.0 credit (Algebra)
  • 1.0 (Geometry)
  • 1.0 credit (Math course code 400 or above)
  • 1.0 credit (Algebra II)
4.0 credits 4.0 credits
Science
  • 1.0 credit (Biology)
  • 1.0 credit (Chemistry)
  • 1.0 credit (Physics)
3.0 credits 3.0 credits
World Language
  • 2.0 credits (World Language course)
Note: Sequential courses in the same language.
2.0 credits 2.0 credits
Career Technical Education (CTE)
  • 1.5 credits (CTE course offering)
  • 0.5 credit (Computer Technology CTE course)
2.0 credits 2.0 credits
Physical Education
  • 0.5 credit (Lifetime Sports)
  • 0.5 credit (Personal Fitness)
  • 0.5 credit (Activity & Nutrition or equivalent PE)
Note: Two years of JROTC taken in a DoDEA school fulfills the 0.5 credit requirement for Lifetime Sports.
1.5 credits 1.5 credits
Fine Arts
  • 1.0 credit (course in visual arts, music, theater, and/or humanities)
1.0 credit 1.0 credit
Health Education
  • 0.5 credit (Health Education course offering)
0.5 credit 0.5 credit
Honors Diploma
  • 0.5 credit in Economic Literacy in CTE, Social Studies, Science & Mathematics
0.5 credit
Economic Literacy: Courses that meet this requirement Business and Personal Finances, Management Foundations, Marketing Entrepreneurship, Financial Literacy, Financial Algebra, Business and Personal Finances, Management and International Business, Environmental Science (including AP), AP Human Geography, Economics (including AP), IB Economics, AP Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, AP Comparative Government and Politics
Summary
Minimum Total Credits 26.0 credits 26.0 credits
Required Courses 21.0 credits 21.5 credits
Elective Courses 5.0 credits 4.5 credits
AP and/or IB Courses 4 courses
Minimum GPA 2.0 GPA 3.8 GPA
*AP and/or IB courses may be used to meet DoDEA requirements.

DoDEA accepts the official courses, grades and earned credits of middle school (grades 7–8) and high school (grades 9–12) students who transfer to a DoDEA school from other DoDEA schools or who earn course credits in an accredited non-DoD system (public or private), correspondence, online, and/or home-school program. The accreditation for the sending school or school system must be from one of the six U.S. regional accrediting associations, one of the U.S. state education agencies, or by a public- or state-supported system of accreditation for public or private education programs in a foreign nation, in accordance with Section 4.7, of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1367.01. Please contact your child’s school for questions regarding course credit transfer process and approval.

Policy Reference:  DoDI 1342.29, “Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children,” January 31, 2017

Policy Reference:  DoDEA Procedural Guide 15-PGED-002, Graduation Requirements and Policy – Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children,” February 4, 2016

Report Card and Testing Information

At the beginning of each course or grade level, every DoDEA teacher shall make available information regarding grading policy and course requirements to parents and students. This information will be provided to parents and students by the end of the first month of the school year or by the end of the first month of the semester in the case of a semester course.

If any student demonstrates unsatisfactory progress or achievement, teachers must notify parents with enough time to correct the deficiency. Notification must occur as soon as unsatisfactory achievement is evident, and not later than the midpoint of the nine-week grading period.

Timely and accurate reporting of student progress shall be accomplished for students in grades 4–12, using the approved DoDEA Electronic Gradebook (EGB) System. All assignments (e.g., quizzes, tests, examinations, homework, speeches, etc.) that are used to assess and report student progress shall be promptly evaluated and/or graded, posted in the EGB, and returned to the student. The normal period of evaluation and posting should be no longer than ten calendar days from the day the assignment is collected, with reasonable exceptions for large projects. At a minimum, one assignment or grade should be recorded per week in the EGB System. To create an account and access the EGB System, please visit Gradespeed (dodea.gradespeed.net) for instructions.

A traditional letter grading system will be used for grades 4–12 report marks.

Grade Numerical Range Description

A

90 – 100

Excellent: Outstanding level of performance

B

80 – 89

Good: High level of performance

C

70 – 79

Average: Acceptable level of performance

D

60 – 69

Poor: Minimal level of performance

F (failing)

0 – 59

Failing (No credit awarded)

For purposes of calculating a student’s high school GPA, the following scales shall be used:

Unweighted Standard Scale Weighted Advanced Placement (with AP exam)

4.0

5.0

3.0

4.0

2.0

3.0

1.0

2.0

0

0

For grades K–3, achievement codes rather than letter grades will be used.

Code Description

CD

Consistently Displayed: Student exhibits the skills/behaviors independently with minimal teacher support.

P

Developing/Progressing: Student exhibits the skills/behaviors with teacher guidance and support.

N

Not Yet Evident: Student exhibits the skills/behaviors in isolated or rare instances, or with a great deal of support.  The performance is inconsistent and below the normal range of expectancy for a student at this grade level.

X

Not addressed: The knowledge, skills, and practices embodied in the grade-level standards were neither taught nor evaluated this marking period.

For grades K–3, achievement codes rather than letter grades will be used.

Code Description

E

Exceeds grade-level expectations: Student exhibits the skills/behaviors independently without teacher support.  Students at this level are exceeding the grade-level standards.

M

Meets grade-level expectations: Student exhibits the skills/behaviors independently with minimal teacher support.

S

Steady progress towards grade-level expectations: Student exhibits the skills/behaviors with teacher guidance and support.

L

Limited progress towards grade-level expectations: Student exhibits the skills/behaviors in isolated or rare instances, or with a great deal of support.  The performance is inconsistent and below the normal range of expectancy for a student at this grade level.

The DVS is the official owner of all grade data associated with a DVS course. Only authorized DVS employees can create or edit official DVS grades. Student transcripts are updated at the end of each semester and the end of each summer school session. All questions regarding grades should be directed to a DVS counselor. For specific DVS grading policies, visit the Grading Policies page.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Students are expected to actively participate in the educational process, including school-sponsored activities in and outside of the classroom, as deemed appropriate. Students should bring to the attention of a school employee behavior or activities that may endanger the safety and well-being of themselves or others.

Students shall:

  1. Comply with policies, procedures and standards for student behavior;
  2. Refrain from conduct or behavior that is disruptive;
  3. Respect the rights and human dignity of other students and all school employees;
  4. Attend school and classes regularly, and punctually and make a conscious effort in all classes;
  5. Participate in and take advantage of educational opportunities provided by DoDEA schools;
  6. Assist school employees in operating a safe school by abiding by the laws of the United States, the local military installation, the host nation, and DoDEA policies, regulations, and procedures;
  7. Properly maintain school property and use school property and equipment for educationally authorized purposes;
  8. Promptly bring to the attention of a DoDEA school employee behavior or activities that may endanger the safety and well-being of themselves or others and to cooperate with school threat assessment procedures; and
  9. Promptly report to the DoDEA School Principal, or another DoDEA school employee, incidents or complaints, including, but not limited to, discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, or non-sexual harassment, based on race, sex, color, national origin, disability, religion, age, sexual orientation or status as a sponsor, parent or legal guardian; intimidation, hazing, bullying (including cyberbullying), or retaliation against persons who report or participate in the investigation of such incidents herein.

Students are expected to dress in a manner that complies with the school’s dress code policy as directed in DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1353.01, “Students Rights and Responsibilities,” April 6, 2021. Please refer to your school’s Web site or school handbook for specific dress code policy.

DoDEA Virtual School students are expected to dress appropriately during their live virtual class sessions. The following dress code applies to students enrolled in the DVS:

Clothing designs, logos, and text should not promote or contain references to sex, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, violence, profanity, racism, sexism, discrimination, or hate speech. 

No revealing clothing is allowed. Examples include, but are not limited to see-through, backless, strapless, thin straps, (straps must be wide enough to cover any undergarment worn), or made of fishnet. 

Students will not wear sunglasses, hats, or other headwear (except for religious or medical reasons) during live sessions.

Student Conduct and Discipline

Management of student behavior is a responsibility shared by students, sponsors/parents/guardians, teachers, and the military command and school communities in general, in accordance with DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1353.01, “Student Rights and Responsibilities,” April 6, 2021. Student behavioral management consists of teaching and reinforcing positive student attitudes and behaviors. Students shall treat teachers, administrators, and other school staff with courtesy, fairness, and respect; and teachers, administrators, and other school staff shall treat students with courtesy, fairness, and respect. All students will be disciplined in a fair and appropriate manner. School administrators shall operate and maintain a safe school environment that is conducive to learning. School administration will ensure prompt investigation and response to incidents or complaints involving students made by students, parents, teachers, or DoDEA staff members.

In accordance with the policy stated in DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1347.01, “Student Disciplinary Rules and Procedures,” April 7, 2021, discipline shall be progressively and fairly administered. Disciplinary actions include, but are not limited to, verbal reprimands, conferences, detention, time-out, alternative in-school placements, school service programs, community service and counseling programs. Other behavior management techniques will be considered prior to resorting to more formal disciplinary actions that remove a student from school for a suspension (short or long term). Long-term suspension or expulsion following a first offense may be considered when a student poses an immediate threat to his or her safety or the safety of others (e.g., offenses involving firearms or other weapons, fighting or violence, or the possession, use, or sale of drugs). Additional rules and procedures can be reviewed in DoDEA Administrative Instruction 1347.01.

In the wake of school violence throughout the world, it is important to analyze the causes of violence and implement preventive measures to assure that every student and adult will feel secure in the school environment. DoDEA implemented a system-wide Bully Prevention program as a part of the Safe Schools and Character Education program.

Stop Bullying now

Bullying is defined as a means to have power over another and it takes many forms: physical, verbal, and indirect such as gossip and isolation. Bullying leaves long-lasting scars for its victims. Bullies have a higher incidence of antisocial behavior, domestic violence and crime as adults. Society pays a heavy toll for tolerating bullying behavior and bullies.

In DoDEA schools and community, bullying will not go unchallenged and will not be tolerated. All students, staff members, parents and the community play vital roles to ensure our children are not bullied, do not act as bullies, and will not allow others to bully. Our schools have a moral obligation to provide our students and the school community with the proper information, prevention strategies, and defenses to create a safe, accepting and caring environment for all.

While enrolled in the DVS virtual option, students are expected to behave respectfully with one another, with teachers, and with support staff. Additionally, each student is to turn in their own work and is to abide by the DoDEA Internet use agreement. When students have violated these or any other issue that may impact their own or other student’s learning, the following steps of action may be invoked, depending upon the seriousness of the issue.

  • Teacher counsels student
  • Teacher and student conference
  • Teacher contacts the parent
  • Student may be referred to the counselor
  • Teacher and counselor may meet to develop behavior interventions
  • Administration, teacher and counselor meet with parent and student
  • Conferences, detentions, suspensions, or referrals are possible at any time depending on the severity or nature of the behavior.

Technology

Each student, together with the student’s parent or guardian (if applicable), shall acknowledge and sign Form 700, “Use of DoDEA Internet and Use of Information Technology Resources,” before he or she is assigned a user account. In accordance with Enclosure 4 of DoDEA Administrative Instruction 6600.01, “Computer Access and Internet Policy,” February 16, 2010, the following are required of all students:

  1. Students shall use DoDEA information technology (IT) resources, including computers, electronic mail, and internet access, only in support of education and for research consistent with the educational objectives of DoDEA; 
  2. Students shall respect and adhere to all of the rules governing access to, and use of, DoDEA’s IT resources; 
  3. Students shall be polite in all electronic communication;
  4. Students shall use courteous and respectful language and/or images in their messages to others;
  5. Students shall not swear, use vulgarities, or use harsh, abusive, sexual, or disrespectful language and/or images;
  6. Students who misuse DoDEA IT resources are subject to disciplinary measures; and
  7. Students’ accounts will be deactivated upon transition out of a DoDEA school.

The signed agreement (Form 700) is to be retained in the administrative office at the student’s school for the duration of the student’s enrollment. A copy will be provided to the student and, if applicable, the student’s parent or guardian.

Use of personal social media between parents/teachers/students is discouraged.  The only acceptable form of social media communication between parents/teachers/students is through official school social media.

Student Transportation

Student transportation is defined as the transportation of students from their assigned bus stop to school at the beginning of their school day, during the mid-day and for return to their assigned bus stop at the end of the normal scheduled school day.  DoDEA principals are responsible for monitoring student loading/unloading zones when students are coming and going from school sites, including administering discipline.  A school bus or any device operating to provide student transportation will function as an extension of the school.  The walking distance for students in grade 6 and below should not exceed one mile from the student’s primary residence to the school or designated bus stop.  Students in grades 7–12 may walk up to 1.5 miles from their primary residence to the school or designated bus stop.  These distances may be slightly expanded or contracted to conform to natural boundaries such as housing areas or neighborhoods.  In locations having middle schools, which include grade 6 (i.e., grades 6–8), the walking distance criteria shall be the same as the criteria for grades 7–12.  

Transportation is not authorized to take students to their homes or to eating facilities for their mid-day meal.  No other transportation between the assigned bus stop and the school will be charged to commuting transportation unless stated in a special education student’s IEP and/or required by Section 504 guidelines.  “Curb-to-curb” only applies to students with disabilities who require such service as documented in the student’s IEP.  DoDEA District Superintendents, in coordination with the District Logistics Chief and the supporting military installation commanders, will establish a commuting area to determine eligibility for transportation of dependent students.

School Policies

The DoDEA Virtual School Discipline Policy is intended to define and interpret key points within the scope of DoDEA Regulation 2051.1 but is not intended to supersede it in content or intent. Students are expected to treat our staff, school property and their peers with respect; students should observe the accepted forms of good behavior. These rules of conduct apply during virtual instruction and learning on Schoology or any other Learning Management System (LMS), using any DoDEA resources, Google Apps and other software, hardware (laptops), and any other technology that is associated with DoDEA Virtual School. These are suggested consequences for when students do not uphold the high standards that have been set for our DVS students. 

Category Description 1st Offense 2nd Offense 3rd Offense

Truancy

Online student truancy consideration takes several elements into account:

  • Number of hours necessary for a student to complete coursework
  • Successful completion of assignments in a timely manner
  • Ongoing communication with the online teacher and School staff
  • Students who are deliberately absent from a required meeting with a teacher

A student is considered in violation of the attendance policy if he/she is not passing an online course AND not logging in to that class

Students who are truant often do not finish a specific task completion for a given time period, communicate with teachers and peers, and do not complete a minimum lesson/unit requirements.

Teacher-Parent Conference/ Admin Notification

 Parent Conference w/Teacher, Admin and Student/SST Referral for Success Plan

3rd Offense: The school administration ultimately reserves the right to

  1. Meet with a parent or sponsor Command assistance
  2. Recommend participation in makeup class(es)
  3. Recommend participation in summer school course(s)
  4. Make recommendations and follow up with the SST process

General Infractions

Category 1 - Minor 1st Offense 2nd Offense 3rd Offense

Examples

  • Disruptive behavior
  • Dress code violation
  • Does not obey instructions
  • Failure to comply
  • Using inappropriate language
  • Uncooperative with teacher

Individual Counseling by Teacher / Parent Notification

Teacher-Parent Conference/ Admin Notification

Parent Conference w/Teacher and Admin and Student/

Develop a Student Behavior Success Plan to Address the Noted Infraction(s)

Category II – Intermediate 1st Offense 2nd Offense 3rd Offense

Examples

  • Cheating
  • Plagiarism
  • Providing false information
  • Disrespectful to another student or adult
  • Insubordination

Teacher-Parent Conference/ Admin Notification

Parent Conference w/Teacher, Admin and Student/

Success Plan

The school administration ultimately reserves the right to suspend LMS & email accounts for up to one week

Category III – Serious 1st Offense 2nd Offense 3rd Offense

Examples

  • Threatening behavior
  • Insubordination with disrespect and profanity
  • Bullying/Cyber Bullying
  • Sexually offensive behavior

Parent Conference w/Teacher, Admin and Student/Success Plan

 

Sexually offensive behavior can result in the completion of a Problematic Sexual Behavior in Children and Youth Matrix Referral

The school administration ultimately reserves the right to suspend LMS & email accounts for up to one week

The school administration ultimately reserves the right to suspend LMS & email accounts for up to two weeks

Category IV:  Severe 1st Offense 2nd Offense

Examples

  • Threatening to harm, bully, harass, or abuse others, sexual harassment or harm
  • Bomb threat

The school administration ultimately reserves the right to immediately terminate LMS & email accounts, notify law enforcement, and if applicable, initiate an Expulsion/Discipline Committee Hearing

*in coordination with the student’s  Brick-and-Mortar School Administration

Required Expulsion Recommendation/Discipline Committee Hearing

*in coordination with the student’s  Brick-and-Mortar School Administration

Online/Electronic Communication Infractions

Category I – Minor 1st Offense 2nd Offense 3rd Offense

Examples

  • Misuse of email or instant message web conference tools (Chat box, Google Hangouts, Google Meet, Teams, etc.) 
  • Spamming
  • Contacting inappropriate persons
  • Using e-mail at inappropriate times

Individual counseling by teacher/Parent Notification

Teacher-Parent Conference/ Admin Notification

Parent Conference with Teacher and Admin to include a Student/ Success Plan

Category II:  Intermediate 1st Offense 2nd Offense 3rd Offense

Examples

  • Sending or receiving offensive materials
  • Violating copyright
  • Using computer resources without permission

Teacher-Parent Conference

Admin Notification

Parent Conference with Teacher and Admin to include a Student/Success Plan

The DVS school administration ultimately reserves the right to suspend LMS & email accounts for up to one week

Category III:  Serious 1st Offense 2nd Offense

Examples

  • Intentionally or willfully modifying, deleting or misusing public files
  • Intentionally or willfully attempting to get around safety and security measures (i.e., web filters, virus scan)
  • Using another user’s account or allowing student’s own account to be used by others
  • Intentionally or willfully accessing restricted or private information
  • Cyber Bullying
  • Sexually offensive behavior

The DVS school administration ultimately reserves the right to suspend LMS & email accounts for up to two weeks and, if applicable, to notify to law enforcement agencies.

 

Sexually offensive behavior can result in a Problematic Sexual Behavior in Children and Youth Matrix Referral

The DVS school administration ultimately reserves the right to suspend or to immediately terminate LMS & email accounts and, if applicable, to notify to law enforcement agencies.  An Expulsion or Discipline Committee Hearing may be required *

*in coordination with the Brick-and-Mortar School Administration

Category IV: Severe 1st Offense 2nd Offense

Examples

  • Repeatedly using electronic means to threaten, bully, harass and/or abuse others
  • Intentionally accessing restricted or private information
  • Intentionally damaging hardware, software, or network; changing network or computer configurations

The school administration ultimately reserves the right to immediately terminate LMS & email accounts, and, if applicable, to notify to law enforcement agencies.  An Expulsion or Discipline Committee Hearing may be required *

*in coordination with the Brick-and-Mortar School Administration

Expulsion Recommendation Required/Discipline Committee Meeting*

*in coordination with the Brick-and-Mortar School Administration

Glossary

Infraction Description

Bomb threat

Willful and malicious threat to destroy school property.  Includes such action as the use or threat of bombs and/or explosives.

Bullying

Bullying is a widespread and serious problem across our nation. It's what happens when someone repeatedly hurts or threatens another person on purpose. Bullying comes in many forms-name-calling, leaving people out, spreading rumors or physically hurting someone. And it can happen in person, in writing, online, on cell phones, in school, on the bus, at home, or anywhere. It is not a normal rite of passage; it has serious consequences and it's NOT acceptable. A repeated occurrence over time.

Cheating/Providing false information

 

Cheating and providing false information are done willfully and knowingly by the student to act dishonestly or unfairly in order to gain an advantage.

Examples include:

  • Sharing of information among test takers or the use of covert notes or crib sheets
  • Obtaining the questions or answers to a test ahead of time
  • On essay assignments or term papers cheating often takes the form of plagiarism.
  • Contract cheating has been observed, where students have work completed on their behalf.
  • Using websites and other electronic devices to retrieve answers to questions when not authorized to do so.  

Contacting inappropriate persons

All student user accounts should be used for school related activities.  When students use their school assigned accounts to contact persons outside of school sponsored assignments, they could be in violation of contacting inappropriate persons.

Examples could include:

  • Participating in illegal or prohibited activities, such as those related to gambling, illegal weapons, or terrorist activities.
  • Pursuing private commercial business activities, including those conducted on Internet sites (online buying and selling sites).
  • Using/linking their personal social media accounts to their student.dodea.edu email account unless the site is DoDEA approved

Cyber Bullying

Cyber bullying Involves harassing, embarrassing, or threatening a young person via the Internet, email and mobile device. Technically, cyber-bullying takes place between two or more young people. When adults are involved, it is typically referred to as cyber-harassment or cyber-stalking.

Did not obey instructions/Failure to Comply

Refusal to carry out instructions, open defiance of faculty or staff members or repeated violations of school/class rules or behavior which threatens the immediate safety or welfare of students/staff

Disrespectful to another student

Use of profane, vulgar or obscene words or gestures; or actions that are ethnically or racially inflammatory; or disrespectful conduct.

Disrespect to teacher or another adult

Refusal to carry out instructions, open defiance, or disrespect of faculty or staff members or repeated violations of school/class rules or behavior which threatens the immediate safety or welfare of students/staff.  

Disruptive behavior

Acts which may cause substantial disruption of learning opportunities. 

Examples can vary by grade level but can include but are not limited to:

  • Repeatedly leaving and entering the learning space.
  • Making loud and disruptive noises
  • Continually interrupting a speaker
  • Opening multiple windows
  • Refusing to mute their microphone

Dress code violation

 Students shall dress in an appropriate manner so as not to distract or interfere with the operation of the school.

  • Students must be fully clothed online.
  • Students will not wear any clothing that displays drugs/alcohol, paraphernalia, or is sexual in nature.)

Insubordination with disrespect and profanity

Refusal to carry out instructions, open defiance, or disrespect of faculty or staff members or repeated violations of school/class rules or behavior which threatens the immediate safety or welfare of students/staff.  

Use of profane, vulgar or obscene words or gestures; or actions that are ethnically or racially inflammatory; or disrespectful conduct.

Intentionally accessing restricted private data

Attempt to harm or destroy data of another user, the internet, or any other network. This includes creating or knowingly transmitting a computer virus or worm, or attempting unauthorized access to files, computers, or networks (i.e., "hacking").

Deliberately with malice intent and determined intention to do as one wants, regardless of the consequences gaining or attempting to gain unauthorized access to other computer systems.

Gain, or attempt to gain, unauthorized access to other computer systems. Examples include:

  • Accessing Teacher’s Courseware
  • Accessing Teachers Gradebook
  • Accessing Other students/teachers personal accounts.
  • Accessing ASPEN.

Intentionally/willfully attempting to get around safety and security measures (i.e., web filters, virus scan)

Deliberately with malice intent and determined intention to do as one wants, regardless of the consequences disabling any IT security or auditing system software.

Intentionally/Willfully modifying, deleting or misusing public files

Deliberately with malice intent and determined intention to do as one wants, regardless of the consequences modifying, deleting or misusing public/shared files.

Examples include:

  • Deleting or modifying courseware
  • Deleting or modifying shared documents without the consent of all collaborators

Misuse of email/Instant Message Web Conference Tools (Chat box, Google Hangouts, Google Meet, etc.)

A Chat box is a computer program that is designed to simulate human conversation. Users communicate with these tools using a chat interface or via voice, just like they would converse with another person.

Google Hangouts allows conversations between two or more users. The service can be accessed online through Gmail.

Like Hangouts, Google Meet also offers group video calls, not just video chat, but in an expanded capacity.

Harassment is characterized by or using ongoing pressure or intimidation.

The student Acceptable Use Policy covers email as well as other technologies.

Below are examples of misuse:

  • Using Email, Chat box, and Google Hangout is for other than school related communication.
  • Sending harassing messages or content.
  • Sending spam email messages or content.
  • Sending messages that contain a virus or other malicious content.
  • Sending or reading email at inappropriate times, such as during class instruction.
  • Sending emails and messages to share test answers or promote cheating in any way.
  • Using the account of another person.
  • Sending "chain letters" or "broadcast" messages to individuals or to lists of individuals.
  • Attempting unauthorized access to files, computers, or networks (i.e., "hacking")
  • Pursuing private commercial business activities, including those conducted on Internet sites (online buying and selling sites).
  • Sending, or knowingly receiving material that is illegal or offensive to others, such as hate speech or any material that ridicules others based on race, creed, religion, color, sex disability, national origin, or sexual orientation.
  • Sending, or knowingly receiving material that is obscene, pornographic, or sexually suggestive.
  • Participating in illegal or prohibited activities, such as those related to gambling, illegal weapons, or terrorist activities.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is copying another person's ideas, words or writing and pretending that they are one's own work. It can involve violating copyright laws.

Sending or receiving offensive materials

Creating, accessing, downloading, viewing, storing, copying, sending, or knowingly receiving material that is illegal or offensive to others, such as hate speech or any material that ridicules others based on race, creed, religion, color, sex disability, national origin, or sexual orientation.

Creating, accessing, downloading, viewing, storing, copying, sending, or knowingly receiving material that is obscene, pornographic, or sexually suggestive.

Sexually offensive behavior (Problematic Sexual Behavior in Children and Youth Matrix and Referral)

Sexual harassment is unwelcome words or behaviors that are sexual or sex-based in nature from students or adults (of the same gender or not) that interfere with your ability to learn, study, work, or participate in school or work activities.

The harassment can be in the form of words said or written, something visual, or some form of unwanted physical touching that is sexual or targets you for your gender. The conduct can make you feel embarrassed, sad, scared, pressured, upset, uncomfortable, humiliated, or angry, and interferes with your ability to focus on what you’re doing or to feel safe at school or work. It can happen on or off school grounds, in person or through other ways, such as by email or social media. It can range from mildly annoying comments or actions to unwanted touching and, in extreme cases, sexual activity forced upon a person without their voluntary or lawful consent, known as sexual assault, sexual violence, or rape.

Spamming

Spamming is the act of sending unsolicited, bulk (and usually commercial) electronic messages. Though this can be done through any number of media, the most common is email.

Spamming deliberately disrupts network use by others. Therefore, students will not send "chain letters" or "broadcast" messages to individuals or to lists of individuals.

Threatening behavior

Communication of a threat intended to terrorize school employee(s) or student(s)

Verbal assault, threatening, or intimidating another individual with violence

Threatening to harm, bully, harass, or abuse others, sexual harassment

Communication of a threat intended to terrorize school employee(s) or student(s)

Verbal assault, threatening, or intimidating another individual with violence

Commission of an act of indecent exposure, sexual contact, or transmission of sexual material

Uncooperative with teacher/Insubordination

Refusal to carry out instructions, open defiance, or disrespect of faculty or staff members or repeated violations of school/class rules or behavior which threatens the immediate safety or welfare of students/staff

Using another user’s account or allowing another user to use yours

 

Computer accounts should only be used by the student to whom the account was issued to. Only DoDEA approved software and applications should be used by students on DoDEA issued equipment.

Examples of misuse:

  • Not logging out of your account when work is completed.
  • Willfully and knowingly logging into someone else's account.
  • Sharing passwords with other individuals.

Using computer resources without permission

Computer accounts should only be used by the student to whom the account was issued. Only DoDEA approved software and applications should be used by students on DoDEA issued equipment.

Examples of misuse:

  • Not logging out of your account when work is completed.
  • Willfully and knowingly logging into someone else's account.
  • Sharing passwords with other individuals.
  • Plugging in external devices that are not approved.
  • Downloading and installing software
  • Participating in illegal or prohibited activities, such as those related to gambling, illegal weapons, or terrorist activities.
  • Pursuing private commercial business activities, including those conducted on Internet sites (online buying and selling sites).

Using electronic means (email/Instant Message Web Conference Tools, Chat box, Google Hangouts, Google Meet, etc.)  to threaten, bully, harass and/or abuse others

A Chat box is a computer program that is designed to simulate human conversation. Users communicate with these tools using a chat interface or via voice, just like they would converse with another person.

Google Hangouts allows conversations between two or more users. The service can be accessed online through Gmail.

Like Hangouts, Google Meet also offers group video calls, not just video chat, but in an expanded capacity.

The student acceptable use policy covers email as well as other technologies.

Below are examples of misuse:

  • Sending harassing messages or content.
  • Sending, or knowingly receiving material that is illegal or offensive to others, such as hate speech or any material that ridicules others based on race, creed, religion, color, sex disability, national origin, or sexual orientation.
  • Sending, or knowingly receiving material that is obscene, pornographic, or sexually suggestive.
  • Using swear words, use vulgarities, or using harsh, abusive, sexual, or disrespectful language and/or images.

Using e-mail at inappropriate times

Using e-mail at inappropriate times could include but is not limited to sending or reading email at inappropriate times, such as during class instruction and sharing test answers that promote cheating in any way.

Using inappropriate language

Use of profane, vulgar or obscene words or gestures; or actions that are ethnically or racially inflammatory; or disrespectful conduct.

Violating copyright

A copyright is a law that gives the owner of a written document, musical composition, book, picture, or other creative work, the right to decide what other people can do with it. Copyright laws make it easier for authors to make money by selling their works. Because of copyright, a work can only be copied if the owner of the copyright gives permission.

When someone copies or edits a work that is protected under copyright without permission, the owner may sue for the value of the violation. Most such cases are handled by civil law.

Willfully Damaging Hardware, Software, or network; changing configurations

Deliberately with the intention of causing harm causing physical damage to school owned hardware, software, or networks or changing the configurations of the same.

Examples are:

  • Creating or knowingly transmitting a computer virus or worm, or attempting unauthorized access to files, computers, or networks (i.e., "hacking")
  • Attempting to disable any IT security or auditing system.
  • Willful and malicious destruction of, or threat to destroy, school property including online software and hardware.

The DoDEA Virtual School expects all students to abide by ethical academic standards. In an online environment, plagiarism and cheating is one of the greatest concerns in regard to student achievement. Whether intentional or not, the use of other people's work can result in severe consequences.

Students are encouraged to work with each other on educational tasks using interactive technologies such as instant messaging, discussion boards, and DoDEA student Google applications as needed. However, note that any obvious signs of cheating or copying may require the student to resubmit the assignment for a grade, especially for younger students. For students enrolled in courses for high school credit, depending upon the circumstances, students may receive a zero for the assignment and an administrative referral.  

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism, cheating or copying the work of another, using technology for illicit purposes, or any unauthorized communication between students for the purpose of gaining advantage during an examination is strictly prohibited. These expectations apply to all school-related tests, quizzes, reports, class assignments, and projects, both in and out of class.

Students are expected to engage in respectful communication with their teacher and other students in a variety of ways to support instruction within their online course. Respectful communication with peers using instant messaging and discussion boards allow students to share ideas and reflect and modify their own understanding of concepts.

Teacher-student communications are conducted via the following technologies based upon need and availability:

  • Phone
  • E-mail
  • Instant Message (IM)
  • Web Conferencing

Teachers are not only subject matter experts in their chosen fields but are generally knowledgeable on the use of computers and our online learning environment. Think of your teachers as your first point of contact when you need help with your course materials or for any technical concerns. You should feel free to contact your teacher with any question and especially when you do not understand a concept in your readings or the instructions for an assignment or a test. If your teacher cannot answer a question, they will give you the information you need to contact the appropriate person(s) or department.

If you have questions or seek clarification about course assignments, please schedule a time for extra help with your teacher. Please do not hesitate to ask for help at any time.

Office of DoDEA Policy

The Policy Team of OPLP administers and operates the DoDEA Issuance Program, the Issuance Focal Point Working Group, and facilitates DoD-level issuance coordination for DoDEA.

Policy and Legislation