Skip to main content

Super Typhoon Yutu

Super Typhoon Yutu Update: 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 26, Guam time

With Super Typhoon Yutu moving away from the Marianas, the question remains: Which way will it go in the long term? Check the Andersen Air Force Base, GuamUS Naval Base Guam and Guam Homeland Security/Office of Civil Defense for the latest weather updates.


Super Typhoon Yutu Update: 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, Guam time

Typhoon warnings and watches for the Marianas Islands have been canceled, according to the National Weather Service. A flash-flood watch does remain in effect, though, as the last of the back-side rainbands keep hitting the islands as Super Typhoon Yutu moves west. Check the Andersen Air Force Base, GuamUS Naval Base Guam and Guam Homeland Security/Office of Civil Defense for the latest weather updates.


Super Typhoon Yutu Update: 2 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, Guam time

US National Weather Service Guam At 2AM the center of eye is completely over Tinian and just skimming the southern portion of Saipan. Extensive lightning throughout...and just outside of the 'eye' is the very destructive eyewall surrounding the eye. We hope the best for the people of Tinian and Saipan. Check the Andersen Air Force Base, GuamUS Naval Base Guam and Guam Homeland Security/Office of Civil Defense for the latest weather updates.


Typhoons

Hurricane image

Typhoons are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The Pacific typhoon season runs May 15 to November 30.

Typhoons:

  • Can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans.
  • Can affect areas more than 100 miles inland.
  • Are most active in September.
The Latest on Super Typhoon Yutu

Typhoon_Yutu

Tips from the Department of Homeland Security

prepareWhat to do before, during, and after a typhoon

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk of hurricanes.
  • Monitor the local military installation and community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • If you are at risk for flash flooding, watch for warning signs such as heavy rain.
  • Practice going to a safe shelter for high winds, such as a designated site on the military installation, FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room in a sturdy building on the lowest level that is not subject to flooding.
  • Based on your location and community plans, make your own plans for evacuation or sheltering in place.
  • Become familiar with your evacuation zone, the evacuation route, and shelter locations.
  • Gather needed supplies for at least three days. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets.
  • Keep important documents in a safe place or create password-protected digital copies.
  • Protect your property. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves in plumbing to prevent backups. Consider hurricane shutters. Review insurance policies.

When a typhoon is 36 hours from arriving

  • Turn on your TV or radio in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
  • Stay tuned o instructions from your military community.
  • Restock your emergency preparedness kit. Include food and water sufficient for at least three days, medications, a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies.
  • Plan how to communicate with family members if you lose power. For example, you can call, text, email or use social media. Remember that during disasters, sending text messages is usually reliable and faster than making phone calls because phone lines are often overloaded.
  • Review your evacuation zone, evacuation route and shelter locations. Plan with your family. You may have to leave quickly so plan ahead.
  • Keep your car in good working condition, and keep the gas tank full; stock your vehicle with emergency supplies and a change of clothes.

get informed

When a typhoon is 18-36 hrs from arriving

  • Bookmark your city or county website for quick access to storm updates and emergency instructions.
  • Bring loose, lightweight objects inside that could become projectiles in high winds (e.g., patio furniture, garbage cans); anchor objects that would be unsafe to bring inside (e.g., propane tanks); and trim or remove trees close enough to fall on the building.

When a typhoon is 6-18 hours from arriving

  • If you’re not in an area that is recommended for evacuation, plan to stay at home or where you are and let friends and family know where you are.
  • Close storm shutters, and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
  • Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary. If you lose power, food will last longer. Keep a thermometer in the refrigerator to be able to check the food temperature when the power is restored.
  • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

listen to official broadcasts

When a typhoon is 6 hours from arriving

  • If you’re not in an area that is recommended for evacuation, plan to stay at home or where you are and let friends and family know where you are.
  • Close storm shutters, and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
  • Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary. If you lose power, food will last longer. Keep a thermometer in the refrigerator to be able to check the food temperature when the power is restored.
  • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

Survive DURING

  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Do not drive around barricades.
  • If sheltering during high winds, go to a FEMA safe room, ICC 500 storm shelter, or a small, interior, windowless room or hallway on the lowest floor that is not subject to flooding.
  • If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising flood water.
  • Listen for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery outdoors ONLY and away from windows.
  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown! Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Listen to command and community authorities for information and special instructions.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.
  • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
Tropical Cyclone Conditions of Readiness (TCCOR) Conditions

TCCOR 5 - Winds of 50 knots sustained or greater are possible within 96 hours

  • Obtain sandbags for residence. Review all TCCOR checklists and actions. Monitor AFN, Installation Social Media outlets, Installation and Local weatehr sources for emergency actions or changes in TCCOR conditions.

TCCOR 4 - Winds of 50 knots sustained or greater are possible within 72 hours

  • Obtain emergency supplies. Have 72 hours of food and water on hand. Review all TCCOR checklists and actions.

TCCOR 3 - Winds of 50 knots sustained or greater are possible within 48 hours.

  • Remove or secure all outdoor/balcony items. Fill vehicle gas tanks. Keep important documents safe/accessible. Clean debris from gutters, storm drains, sidewalks, and ditches near your quarters. Low lying area residents relocate vehicles to higher ground.

TCCOR 2 - Winds of 50 knots sustained or greater are anticipated within 24 hours.

  • Continue securing outside items. Be prepared to cover broken windows. Sandbag door sills (available at installation NEXs, PXs and Auto Ports).

TCCOR 1 - Winds of 50 knots sustained or greater are anticipated within 12 hours.

  • Move sensitive items away from windows or cover with plastic. Fill bathtub with water, turn refrigerator/freezer to highest settings, keep children home from DoDEA schools if called prior to 0500, move sensitive items away from windows.

TCCOR 1 Caution - Winds of 35-49 knots sustained are occurring.

  • All non-essential travel is suspended. Non-essential personnel should return to place of residence and remain indoors. Pick up children from CDC’s/SAP within 1 hour. Monitor AFN, Installation Social Media outlets, Installation and Local weatehr sources for emergency actions or changes in TCCOR conditions.

TCCOR 1 Emergency - Winds of 50 knots sustained or greater are occurring.

  • All personnel will remain indoors and stay away from windows. Monitor AFN, Installation Social Media outlets, Installation and Local weatehr sources for emergency actions or changes in TCCOR conditions. Report all damage to Installation Housing Maintenance and Emergency Management Offices.

TCCOR 1 Recovery - Winds of 50 knots sustained or greater are no longer forecast to occur. Strong winds may still exist.

  • Personnel will not leave their residence/shelter unless called into work by Installation Commander.
  • Report all damage to Installation Housing Maintenance and Emergency Management Offices.

All Clear - The storm is over and not forecast to return. Storm damage could present a danger.

  • Personnel should remain indoors until the recovery process is complete or the risk of injury/damage to personnel and property has been mitigated to a safe level.

Storm Watch - Winds are not forecast to exceed 50 knots sustained but there still exists a probability of high winds due to the proximity of the storm. It is also close enough that a heightened alert status is necessary should the storm deviate from the forecast track.

  • Remain alert and monitor AFN, Installation Social Media outlets, Installation and Local weatehr sources for emergency actions or changes in TCCOR conditions. Exercise caution while outdoors.
Helpful Links
Japan Meteorological Agency

Japan Meteorological Agency

JMA provides a wide range of information including data on current weather, forecasts and warnings as well as historical records, and contribute to enlightenment on various meteorological affairs.
NOAC Yokosuka

NOAC Yokosuka

The mission of the Naval Oceanography Antisubmarine Warfare Center, Yokosuka is to provide asymmetric war fighting advantage for ASW forces in Seventh and Fifth Fleets through application of oceanographic sciences; and accurate and timely weather forecasts, warnings and recommendations for COMNAVFORJAPAN ashore forces to facilitate asset protection responsibilities and risk management decisions.